Skip to main content

Full text of "Townsend's 20th century catalog strawberries and how to grow them"

See other formats


Historic, archived document 

Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



1 1 20— (^"^"''^ Gataloq 




Registered in United States 

Patent Office 1930. Originated 

by Everett C. Howard of Bel- 

chertown, Mass., year 1909. 

W. TOWNSEND & SONS, Sole Distributors, 

under contract with said Everett C. Howard. 

A berry perfect in every sense of the word— Something- far ahead of any in cultivation. 
(For History and Breeding, see page 31.) 



IN INTRODUCING this variety, whicli is possi- 
bly the best variety of strawberries, of the 
standard class ever offered the public, we deeply 
appreciate the honor of being selected by Mr. 
Howard as being the introducers and sole dis- 
tributors of this grand variety which is sure to 
mean millions of dollars in extra profits to the 
strawberry growers throughout the country. 

In practically every case where HOWARD'S 
SUPREME has been tested (and it has been 
grown by a good many Experiment Stations from 
10 to 15 years), it has proven not only equal to 
Premier, but in practically every instance has 
proven better in every respect. HOWARD'S 
SUPREME can only be appreciated when seen 
growing and fruiting. 

Some of its outstanding features : 

In plant growth it is truly a wonder. Strong, 
healthy, vigorous grower. Plants upright, with 
strong fruiting stems. Foliage simply beautiful. 
Season early to late, being a long crop variety 
that holds size well throughout the season. 

In size it is large to extra large, most berries 



being of a uniform size and shape. In color it is 
a deep red through and through. In quality it is 
equal to any variety on the list. Some of the 
Horticulturists who have grown it for years claim 
that it is equal to Marshall. In firmness it is 
classed as the very best. 

Will equal Premier (Howard 17) in produc- 
tiveness, and in many states has proven from 
15 to 25 per cent more productive than Premier. 

For further descriptions we refer to Mr. How- 
ard, the originator, and several of the leading 
Horticulturists of the different states. 

We were very fortunate in having our stock of 
HOWARD'S SUPREME grown under irrigation 
this year. We have a fine stock of these plants, 
as will be seen from illustration on back page. 

Everyone who receives this catalog — that is 
interested in Strawberries — should place order 
for at least 25 to 100 plants of this variety; also 
same amount of Jupiter, for we consider this pair 
the greatest introduction ever made to the straw- 
berry world. For Prices, see page 30. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, Salisbury, Maryland 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



—MEDIUM EARLY STRAWBERRY 



Originated by the late Oliver C. Cordury 

of Salisbury, Md., at his trial grounds at 

Laurel, Del., year 1925. 




The JUPITER is a scien- 
tific cross between Premier 
and Gandy. In plant growtli 
it sliows more like Gandy. 
Also the fruit resembles the 
Gandy both in color and 
quality. But in season of 
ripening and in productive- 
ness it resembles the Pre- 
mier. The foliage is very 
strong and upright, holding 
the loads of fruit well off the 
ground. It Avill nearly equal 
\ Premier in productiveness, 
I and the years that we have 
had it under test it has made 
a fine healthy growth of plants each year. 

After making the successful cross. Mr. Cor- 
dury gave us over his entire lot of seedlings to 
propagate, stating that he did not have the time 
to give same proper attention. There were sev- 
eral good seedlings from this cross, but the one 
chosen and now being introduced as .lUPITER, 
showed so much better than any of the others 
that we have discarded them. JUPITER will 
equal Gandy in size. A rich bright red color that 
is almost identical with Gandy. Firm a.s Gandy, 
with the deep red color inside same as found in 
Premier. The blossoms are well supplied with 
pollen, making it an ideal variety to plant with 
imperfect sorts of its season, and for this reason 
we have selected it as a proper mate for our 
Howard's Supreme. 



Xiarg'e and Attractive. 



Being that we are intro- 
ducing this variety before 
having it tested by the vari- 
ous State Experimental Sta- 
tions ( as this process great- 
ly delays the introduction — 
and we believe that it is too 
good to be kept from the 
public any longer), we are 
introducing it with the fol- 
lowing Guarantee: 

That it is a strong healthy 
plant grower and not subject 
to rust. That it is well above 
the average in productive- 
ness. That fruit is a bright 
rich shiny red in color. Large to extra large in 
size. Firm enough to make a long distance ship- 
per. That the flavor is mild and sweet enough 
to suit most tastes. That it will make a strong 
pollenizer for any medium early imperfect sort. 
If planted on good soil and given good cultiva- 
tion with proper seasons, it fails to make good 
nny of the above points we will gladly refund 
the purchase price. We take all the chance in 
this our new introduction. And predict that it 
will prove to be one of our big winners in a short 
time. 

12 Plants, $2.65; 25 plants, $4.00; 50 plants, 
$6.00; 100 plants, $10.00. 



Laceyville, Pa.. April 25, 1930. 
E. W. Townsend & Sons Nurseries, 

Salisbury, Maryland. 
Gentlemen: 

From fifteen hundred of Townsend's plants I picked fifty 
bushels of fine berries besides those preserved for our 
family use. I am planning for another bed the coming 
Spring. 

Very truly yours, 

MRS. F. M. TOHNSON. 
Cspyrighted 1930 by E. W. Townsend & Sons. 



TOWNSENDS PLANTS BEST HE EVER BOUGHT. MR. 

BELL HAS BEEN A CUSTOMER OF OURS FOR 

NEARLY A QUARTER OF A CENTURY 

From Chas. J. Bell, Tenn., writes Oct. 9th, '30.— The 5000 
plants purchased last spring have come through the worst 
drougth ever experienced here. I have a perfect bed and 
prospects for a beautiful crop. 

Your plants have always been superior to any plants I 
have ever grown. And I never fail to speak a good word 
for you. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 3 

Our 1931 Message 

THE Year 1930, will probably go down in history as the most disastrous year any of the farm- 
ers now living have ever experienced. Taking the country over, it has been extremely hot 
and dry. Practically all crops have been injured from fifty to seventy-five per cent. The 
Strawberry crop has been one of the worst failures of any, owing to the fact that plants will not 
take root during extremely dry weather. 

We hare branches in other states, besides our big plant here in Maryland. And they have all 
fared practically the same. We will have less than one- fourth of a crop of strawberry plants, and 
most varieties can be sold only in small lots. We were fortunate in having our "Howard's Supreme" 
plants under irrigation — that is, most of them — and we have an ideal bed of these plants. 

We are very sorry to be compelled to advance our prices at a time like this, when we know that 
our good friends and customers have been "hard hit," as well as ourselves. 

But even at the prices which we are quoting we cannot realize fifty cents on the dollar of what 
we have invested in our crops. We have cut corners everywhere possible in order to make the 
prices. We have cut down our Catalogue. We will do no advertising. Many of our employes have 
volunteered a cut in their salaries, in order to "do their bit." 

And even though the price of plants is advanced, we do not feel that our customers can afford 
not to buy plants this year. With the drought so severe the country over, the acreage cut so much, 
there is sure to be an unheard-of demand for berries for the next few years at least. And a small 
acreage planted this spring is sure to repay big dividends. 

There seems little need that I should advise all our customers to place their orders as soon as 
possible this time. I am sure they all realize this importance. Late orders will not be filled. There 
is absolutely less than one-fourth enough plants grown to fill the demand. 

Thanking you for your many past favors, and hoping that Nineteen Thirty-One will be a pros- 
perous year for you all. I am sincerely yours, 

B. W. TOWNSEND, SR., President. 




(PERFECT FLOWERING) 

— The New Extra Early Straw- 
berry introduced the past season. 
Originated by a Mr. Hurley, in 
Wicomico County, Maryland, being 
a chance seedling, and for the past 
several years has been grown by 
several of our leading berry grow- 
ers in this County, with excellent 
results. 

Season — Very early to ripen. 
Fruit large to extra large. Firm 
enough to be classed as a good 
shipper. Color bright red with a 
heavy double green calix that re- 
sembles the Big ,Joe. Flavor extra 
good, being mild and sweet. Berries 
round to top shape, being very uni- 
form in size. Exceedingly produc- 
tive. Is one of the very best plant 
makers on average soil. Plants 
dark green throughout the growing and fruiting 
season and not subject to rust. FRUITLAND 
is a perfect flowering variety, has an extra large 
bloom that carries an abundance of pollen, which 
makes it extremely valuable to plant with other 
varieties of its season, and especially along with 
such varieties as Howard's Supreme. We fruited 



Fruitland 
WUl 
Demancl 
Top Prices 
in tile 
Market. 



it again the past spring, and it was equal in 
every respect to any early variety on our 
groimds, and surpassed most of them. And 
never failed to sell for at least $1.00 per crate 
more over Premier. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 




(PERFECT 
FLOWERING) 

A big money-maker for 
the market gardener. Last 
spring was our first year 
to fruit ABERDEEN. It 
surpassed our expecta- 
tions in every way. In 
productiveness it led all 
other varieties. 

The size was medium 
to large, averaging about 
same as Premier. While 
we have seen it listed as 
a moderately firm berry, 
it showed on our grounds 
to be very firm, the color 
a rich bright red of uniform size. The 
fruiting season lasting about three 
weeks beginning a few days later than 
.^^Tj. ■ Premier. A mighty fine hardy plant to 

"V;^': grow, and we feel reasonably sure that 

most growers will find it a profitable ad- 
dition to their list. Prof. Watts in his 
article in Market Growers Journal. August 1st, 1930, 
states that in Pennsylvania it ranked first, Premier 
second and Wra. Belt third. 

NOTE — Premier is the most extensively grown 
berry in Pennsylvania. And it takes a real berry to 
take first place over it with the Pennsylvania growers. 




ueen 



MAYQUEEN was originated in 1924 
by E. W. Townsend, Sr., being a scien- 
tific cross between Premier and Town- 
sends Big Late. Was introduced Spring 
1928. 

MAYQUEEN is a late variety that 
shows the blood of both parents. The 
foliage resembles Big Late : makes just 
a good fruiting row of large stalky 
plants that hold the fruit well off the 
ground. The fruit is large to extra 
large, firm, and of the very highest 
quality. Color a bright rich red all over. 
A heavy green calix makes it a real 
show berry. In productiveness it is just 
all any one could wish for. And the 
size is held up well throughout the 
season. I'ou will find this a most valu- 
able variety to plant with "TOWNKING." And these 
two will make a pair worthy of a place in any growers 
garden. We have only a few thousand MAYQUEEN 
plants to offer this season. We prefer to sell these in 
small lots so as to get as good distribution as possible, 
for it is sure to become a winner whereever a good late 
variety is wanted that carries both Quality and 
Quantity. 




Heavy Prodnoers of Fine Quality Berries. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 




PREMIER 
(Howard 17) 



No variety ever introduced to the pub- 
lic has received as much praise as the 
PREMIER. Xo variety has ever been 
grown in such quantity, and no variety 
has made anytliing- like as much money 
for the growers. And while there are 
now being introduced some 
marvelous varieties, which are 
almost sure to take the place 
of the PREMIER, it is going to 
be hard parting between grow- 
^ ers and their old friend 

PREMIER. 

PREMIER has paid off thou- 
sands and thousands of old 
mortgages: purchased and paid 
for new homes, new barns, 
automobiles by the million, and 
the many other needy things 
too numerous to mention. And 
we predict that it will be 
grown in a large way for a great many 
years to come. For the past twelve 
years we have made PREMIER plants 
our specialty. We have grown them in 
larger quantities than any other nur- 
sery. We have shipped them to more 
than fifty thousand different customers, 
and over and over year after year these 
customers come back for more. 

While PREMIER is too well known by 
the leading growers to need a descrip- 
tion, however for the new beginner we 
will say that PREMIER and Howard 17 

same variety. The variety was originated by 

Everett C. Howard of Belchertown, Mass., and has become known by 
many as Howard 17. 

PREMIER begins to ripen early. Covers a very long season. 
Unusually large crops of large to very large berries, uniform m 
size and color. 
Foliage strong and healthy, and not subject to disease. Grows well on any good rich garden soil in any 
part of the country. 

Last PREIIIER has never been known to miss a single crop from late frost. Blooms seem to be more 
hardy than most varieties. When you plant PREMIER you plant frost protection also. 

When you send Townsend vour order for PREMIER plants vou get the best it is possible to grow. There 
will not be one-half enough PREMIER plants grown this time to fill all orders. While we planted a very 
large acreage, something over 100 acres, to PREMIER, we have less than one-third of a crop. We have made 
the price just as low as possible, and would advise our friends placing their order soon as possible, as 
that will be the only way to get plants at any price. 



one 




PERFECT 
FLOWERING 



shading to a darker red 
when thoroughly ripe. Size medium, of a round to conical shape. Red 
to the center without green tips. Flavor excellent and very firm. In 
productiveness it can be classed with such varieties as Dunlap, which 
has always been first in this respect. Our stock of plants are from the 
original source, and have been both State and Federal inspected this 
season, and we hold a clean cartificate. 

It is our opinion that BLA/CKEMORE will be more valuable to the 
growers south of the Mason and Dixon line, as we do not believe it will 
equal such varieties as Premier, Aberdeen. Jupiter, Fruitland or Ho- 
ward's Supreme in the Middle or Northern States. 



Blakemore is an origination of Professoj B_eatty of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. Washington, D. C. It has 
been tested pretty thoroughly in most of the strawberry 
growing states, and every Station that we have had reports 
on speak very favora- 
bly of it. 

Said to be a cross be- 
tween Premier and Mis- 
sionary. In plant growth 
it resembles the Mis- 
sionary very much, be- 
ing a strong grower of 
small size plants. The 
fruit is bright red. 



THE SESCRIFTIOITS in our cat alogue of the leading standard 
varieties and ITEWEB VARTETTES are the true description, as 
we have found them on our own trial grounds; together ■with the 
descriptions sent in to us by our thousands of customers, and 
the various i:XFEBIMi:iTTA.I. STATION'S throughout the coun- 
try. We recommend all our custonxers trying out a few new^ va- 
rieties each year, which will show the steady progress being 
made in the developing of better fruits for the table or market. 




E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



Early and Medium Early Varieties 




HEFLIN EARLY 



— Originated in Virginia, and grown 
quite extensively in that state up 
to a few years ago. We have some trade that still demand it. 
Fruit medium in size, poor in quality; very productive; a good 
plant maker. 



KLONDYKE 



(Per). — Improved strain. Same as the old 
standard except improved thru plant se- 
lection. One of the nio.st valuable varieties for the South and 
Southwestern States. Townsend's strain of Klondyke plants has 
been known for over twenty years as the best money could buy. 
And will produce from two to three times as much fruit as the 
common grown Southern Klondyke. Many of the largest Asso- 
ciations send to us every year for Good Klondyke plants. 

§'y LOUIS '^^^^^ i^ '^^ extra early berry of Southern ori- 

* gin. Large size and very productive. Color 

light red. Lasts only a short time. Where an extra large early 
berry is wanted, especially for the Southern States, we recom- 
mend St. Louis for trial. Not recommended for long distance 
shipping. 

TQWNSEND^S SELECT MISSIONARY 

Dr. Burrill. — Townsend's Select Missionary is the one ideal variety for 
Southern growers. It is this variety that you see on the fancy 
fruit stands in the Northern markets from Thanksgiving to March 15th every year. Large blood 
red juicy berries that sell from 50 cents to over $1.00 per quart. It is the berry that put 
Florida on the map as a strawberry state. We introduced this variety to the State of Florida in 
1908. Since that time we have shipped probably 100.000.000 plants into that State, and to date it is 
growing stronger than ever. Few varieties have been sent out that has kept the faith so long a time. 
We begin to ship plants into Florida about October 1st for the main crop of fruit, and again shipping 
starts in .Innn.iry for plant propagating for those wishing to grow their own stock phinis 

(200PER ^P^*")- — ^Jedium Early. Large to extra large. Irreg- 

iilar in size and shape. Qualit.v fair. Productive. 

F.-iii- phmt ni.ikcr. Mo(l('rntel.\ firm. Lots better varieties. 



Senator Dunlap 



(DR. BURRILL) Per.— The Dunlap is an 
ohl time favorite in many sections of the 
counny. Not suited for the Southern States. A great plant maker 
and a great yielder when the season is not too dry. Fruit medium in 
size, dark red in color, and of good quality. A little soft for long dis- 
tance shipping. There are lots better varieties at this time. We can 
see no difference in this variet.v and Senator Dunlap. 



SUCCESS 

very iiroductive. 



— Very early, medium to large in size; (luality ordi- 
nary; suitable for home garden or nearby market; 
Lots of better early varieties. 




Townsenfl's Select Missionary. 



ONE ORDER OF OUR PLANTS WILL BE CONVINCING 



(FINDS LUCKY STRIKE BEST EVERBEARING 
STRAWBERRY) 

From Mr. and Mrs. Losgrove of N. J. Sept. 20th, 1930.— 
We bought our first plants from you three years ago, getting 
some Lucky Strikes to try out. We have ordered some of 
these plants every year since. And last spring as you in- 
creased the price on the Luckies, we split our order and 
took 2500 each Mastodon and Luckies. We paid ^30.00 per 
1000 for the Luckies, and $12.50 for Mastodon, trying to save 
a little money. Last week we picked SOO quarts from the 
3500 Lucky Strike plants, and less than 10 quarts from the 
Mastodon. We are getting fifty cents per quart at our road 
stand and could get more if we asked for it. We want to 
set 50,000, all Luckies, next spring, and will not fuss about 
the price. 



TOWNKING DID FINE 

From Thomas Horton, N. Y. — Townking plants purchased 
last year did fine. They truly are beautiful berries. Will 
want more next .spring. 



TOWNSEND'S PLANTS BEST BUY IN THE 
UNITED STATES 

From Gustave Schnepp, L. I., N. Y.. written Aug. 17th, 
1930. — Getting plenty berries from the Lucky Strike and 
Mastodon plants. I am the only one around the neighbor- 
hood getting plenty berries. 

I am well pleased and you will get all the orders around 
here next time I am sure. I have bought a good many 
plants from all over the United States. You have them ali 
beat. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 




BIG JOE 



■V w 



as the name ini= 
plies, is a bero' 
of extra large 
size. Color very 
bright with an 
attractive green 
cap. The texture 
is one of the best, 
giving excellent 
shipping results. 
For the home or 
commercial pur- 
poses BIG JOE 
will be found giv- 
ing satisfjiction ; for over 20 
years BIG JOE has been the 
leading medium late strawberry 
in the eastern half of the coun- 
try, and has produced record- 
breaking croi)s wherever grown. 
In size and productiveness BIG 
JOE is second to but very few 
varieties, always bringing top 
price on the market. It is a 
strong hearty plant grower and free 
from disease, such as rust or leaf spot, 
and a great money maker for most 
growers. Likes a mellow springy soil. 



Medium Late Varieties 



AROMA 



(Per) — Medium late. A good 
standard variety for most sec- 
tions, especially popular in the Southwestern 
States. Fruit medium to large, moderately pro- 
ductive and of good quality : firm enough to ship 
well. Usually a profitable variety when season 
is not too dry. Owing to the short root system. 
Aroma fails to produce in a very dry season. 

(Per) — A medium to late va- 
riety, that has proven suc- 
cessful in the Southern States. Large to very 
large, firm, and of good quality. Very produc- 
tive. A very good plant maker on most soils. 



BURGESS 



GIBSON (P»''so"'s Beauty) Per — A valu- 

able variety in some localities but 

not a universal favorite. Never plant in the 
Southern States. Fruit large and good eating 
quality, but very soft flesh. Suitable in the 
Xorth for home use or local market. 



SAIVIPLE ^"""P) — A good old-time medium 

to late variety. Fruit large, 

very uniform in size and color when well polin- 
ized with such varieties as Townking, Big Joe 
or Ford. Quality ordinary. Much better varie- 
ties. 



REGULAR SHIPPING SEASON 
OCTOBER 15th to MAY 10th 
ON STRAWBERRY PLANTS 

But in order to accommodate a few 
of our customers who ask for shipments 
to be made during last part of August 
and September, we have planned to 
grow a small acreage under irrigation 
to take care of these orders. Customers 
will kindly add 25 per cent to list price 
on all orders to be shipped in August 
and September. From May 15th to 
August loth we have no plants to ship. 



NUMBER OF PLANTS REQUIRED 
To Set an Acre at a Given Distance Apart 

Bows Plants 

24 inches apart 12 inches in row 20,000 

30 inches apart 12 inches in row 17,000 

36 inches apart 12 inches in row 14,000 

42 inches apart 12 inches in row 12,000 

36 inches apart 18 inches in row 9.500 

42 inches apart 18 inches in row 8,000 

48 inches apart 18 inches in row 7,000 

48 inches apart 24 inches in row 6.000 

48 Inches apart 36 inches In row 5,000 

24 inches apart 24 inches in row 11,000 

30 inches apart 30 inches in row 7,000 

For hill culture rows should be either 24 
inches. 30 inches, or 36 inches, and plants set 
18 inches in row. 

For matted row system, rows should be 
either 42 or 48 inches; plants set 18 inches to 
24 inches in row. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 




Trade MARi* 



For TOWNKING PRICES, see Pajte 30. 

Again TOWNKING heads the list of 
all late to very late varieties. Townking 
has been given a thorough test in every 
strawberry producing state. In every 
section it has more tlian made good onr 
chiinis. When we introduced "Town- 
king" several years ago. we had faith 
enough in it to send it out on a Guar- 
antee that it prove as represented or we 
would refund the purchaser's money. 
We have sold millions of plants in all 
sections, and have never been called 
upon to return the first dollar. 

We could fill a book twice the size of 
this if we were to publish all the good 
things said about Townking. 

Here is what one of our New York 
customers says of it, and he pretty well 
describes it — sufiiciently so that we are 
using his descri))tion this time: 

'•Townking stands in a chiss by itself. 
It is the most poi-fect strawberry I have 
ever seen. As well as the most beauti- 
ful strawberry I have ever seen. In size, 
color, shape, carrying quality as well as 
ability to produce, it is perfect. I have 
never failed to produce a big paying crop 
from Townking plants. In plant growth 
it is the most beautiful of all varieties. 
I have grown it on all kinds of soil with- 
out any rust even in the wettest seasons. 

"Fruit stems are extra large, holding 
the fruit well off the ground. Has 
plenty good strong foliage to shade the 
great loads of fruit. I have never grown any 
Chesapeake that will equal it in size, and the 
only way Chesapeake will touch Townking is in 
eating quality, as I do not believe any variety 
Is better to eat than Chesapeake. The flavor of 
Townking is a soft, rich, mild, aromatic, sweet 
flavor just suiting the taste of the average straw- 
berry lover." 

Mr. Day of Lakeville, Conn., writes Townking 
by far sm'passes any other variety, and suits his 
trade best. 

Another New York grower writes that he has 
discarded all other varieties. 

Still another rural New York grower writes : 
"I have at last found my Ideal strawberry. I 
have been growing Chesapeake for years — 
thought it almost perfect. But Chesapeake is 
nothing by the side of Townking." 

Townking produces largest crops for our Penn- 
sylvania customer — produced more than one 
quart of finest berries per plant. 

Gross sales from less than one acre — another 
Pennsylvania grower — over $1700.00 first year 
fruited, and $1450.00 second year, without 
proper care for plants. 

A good customer from Shelbyville, Ind., grew 




TOWNKING 

The New Late 

Berry — The Money=Makers 



Townking that measured over five inches around, 
and says they were simply delicious. 

Mr. Simpson of Maryland states that he has 
never grown any strawberries that equal Town- 
king. There are thousands more singing the 
praise of Townking — all the same tune. Take 
this tip if you are not already growing Town- 
king — GROW THEM. 



TOWNSENDS PLANTS 100% PERFECT 
From Jacob Wallace, N. Y., Aug. 11th. — I am writing about 
my order of plants received last spring, Premier variety. 
I have never seen such strong growing plants as you send 
out. Some neighbors advised me to buy our own state 
plants as I would not get good plants from Maryland. I 
sure have the laugh on them now. My plants are 100% 
perfect. And I have not seen another bed half as good. 

2593 Main St.. Hartford Conn., April 16, 1930. 
E. W. Townsend & Sons Nursery, 

Salisbury, Maryland. 
Gentlemen : 

My order of plants received in fine order, and I want to 
thank you for your careful attention given my order. If 
they do not grow, it will be no fault of yours. 
Very truly yours, 

A. A. SHAW. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



FOSD. 
£arge Dark Sed. 




s 



Late to Very Late Varieties 

DQQC'T'p'p (Per). — Very late, of medium size, good qual- 

iry : very firm and sweet. Recommended for 

Hails from Bridg- 



WORLD'S Where an over- 

sized berry is 

WONHFR wanted World's 

the bill. One of the largest and 
ugliest berries on the list. I have 
seen these berries as large as 10 
inches around, seven berries fill- 
ing a quart basket. The flavor is 
very mild and sweet: flesh soft, 
suitable only for home use or lo- 
ral market. Very productive and 
a good grower. We sell millions 
of these plants every year. 

Wm Belt —^ "''^^'^^ ^"^^^ 

with excellent (|uality : very pro- 
ductive. A leader in some locali- 
ties. Greatest trouble it rusts 
bad in wet seasons, and for this 
reason is giving way to better 
varieties. 



home use or market, 
man. Mich. 



Moderately productive. 



/^ A ^DY — Gandy is a very late variety and well known to 

most growers. Excellent quality. Very firm, and 

classed as one of the best shippers on the list. Gandy must be 
planted on low springy soil to do its best. When conditions are 
right Gandy is a valuable variety, as it has size, quality and 
appearance. 

l^m^^Qjl — A very large handsome berry and an excellent 
" shipper. Compares in size with Chesapeake. Very 

attractive in appearance and a good seller on all markets. Makes 
plenty of strong vigorous plants. Not quite as productive as 
Chesapeake, but will hold size longer and nearly every berry good 
perfect one. 

MASCOT (^®'")- — ^^^ o* t^^ ^®^y latest varieties. A 

strong grower of medium size, healthy plants. 

Very productive, and firm enough for a distant shipper. Fruit , 

extra large, of the Gandy type. Si^^^^*. ^ 




TOWNSEND*S BIG LATE -a Tow^send m 

troduction — intro- 
duced by us Spring, 1911, Big Late has been grown in every sec- 
tion where strawberries are grown and has proven itself a great 
money maker for the average grower. I have never tasted a 
better berry. It is surely the aristocrat of the standard varieties 
for quality. Plants are strong, erect, and hold the berries off the 
ground like cherries. No garden is complete without this grand 
variety. Fruit medium to large, bright velvet red and every 
berry looks like it has been varnished. Very few varieties equal 
it In production. 

pQI?^ — Ford is a Townsend production, and one of which 

we are proud. Ford, like Premier, is frost resistant, 

and has made hundreds of our customers big money when other 
late varieties were killed. A strong hardy plant grower on all 
soils. Fruit very large, firm and of good quality, and ranks with 
the very best in production. Ford will make too many plants if 
not restricted, and for this reason should be set wide in the rows 
and grown in narrow matted rows or in hills. We have never 
seen a rust blemish on any Ford plant in ten years growing it, 
and never heard of a crop failure. Plant Ford and you will not 
go astray. 



Branchland, W. Va., 

March 21, 1930. 
E. W. Townsend & Sons Nurseries, 

Salisbury, Maryland. 
Gentlemen: 

Received my plants, and they are do- 
ing fine considering the very dry 
weather, and if I loose any, it will be 
no fault of the plants. 

Very truly yours. 

ORA ADKINS. 



Oswego, N. Y., April 26, 1930. 
E. W. Townsend & Sons Nurseries, 

Salisbury, Maryland, 
Gentlemen: 

Enclosed find order for 3.000 Ford 

plants. The Premier plants ordered from 

you three years ago have done fine. I 

am a well pleased "Townsend Customer." 

Very truly yours, 

L. B. STORR. 



10 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



...^tn^ 




4w 





''\. 



One of Our Big Specials 

Lockport, New York, May 3, 1928. 
Dear Sirs:— I have been handling strawberries for the past 
SO years— and no man can raise better plants than the 30,000 
Chesapeake you shipped me. Please accept my thanks for 
the fine plants and good treatment received from you. My 
friends will give you some nice orders next year, as they 
all admired my plants. I remain yours, 

R. H. YOUNG. 

^J-JJ^Q^pF A I^P — Still the favorite late berry with a majority of growers. For the past 

ten years we have made the growing of Chesapeake plants a specialty, 

every year increasing our acreage and every year finding ourselves sold out before the end of the 
season. Last year we had forty acres of Chesapeake plants all well set and a particular fine lot 
of plants. Yet we did not have enough. This time we have planted fifty acres, and the plants 
are all extra fine but not as heavy set as last year. BOOK YOUR ORDER EARLY. We are now 
booking orders for Chesapeake plants, before our Catalogue is given to the printers. Lots of our 
customers will have no other late variety, and they are always early in placing their orders, so 
as to be sure of getting TOWNSENp'S CHESAPEAKE PLANTS. To most of our customers 
and friends Chesapeake needs no description, but for those who are new in the business we briefly 
describe it as follows: 

QUALITY comes first with Chesapeake. It is simply delicious. 

COLOR: A beautiful rich glossy red. 

SIZE : Berries are very large and hold their size well. 

FIRMNESS: Firm enough to be classed as a good shipper. 

HEALTHY: One of the cleanest, healthiest plants on the list. 

PRODUCTIVENESS : There are very few late varieties that will outyield it. Sets just enough 
fruit to mature all to good size. 

PROFITABLE: You will always find Chesapeake quoted on the market at the top figure. 

GREATEST WEAKNESS: On some soil Chesapeake will not make the desired number of 
plants wanted. Plant on rich or medium rich springy soil and it will aftord plenty plants to make 
a good matted row. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



II 



Everbearing 
Varieties 




LUCKY STRIKE 



THE ARISTOCRAT OF ALL THE 
EVERBEARING STRAWBERRIES 



After the Introduction of the Mastodon, there was so much attention being paid to that berry, and such 
wonderful claims being made that we lowered our prioe-Ton 'f^e LUCKY STRIKJi; to correspond with Masto- 
don. Thousands of our custoiners have tested both varfe^es si^e by side and have found LUCKY STRIKE 
to equal Mastodon in practically every respect, and to'-fe^atljf surpass it on quality. 

We have been very modest in our claims for LUCK^*BTRIKE. Our customers have done most of the 
boosting. We do claim that it is the most worthy Everbearing Strawberry that has ever come to our atten- 
tion both as an everbearer and a spring crop. In a test plot Spring 1928 LUCKY STRIKE was given the 
highest award on the three main qualities that go to make up a strawberry — namely Quality of Fruit, Size 
and Beauty, as well as Productiveness. In this test plot were all the very best late and midseason sorts. 
^^■^len I teil you that LUCKY STRIKE is not only the best Everbearing Strawberry, but the best variety for 
spring crop "that we ha\ e tested on our farms in the past thirty years, I am speaking the truth as I have 
found it. and am not making this claim in order to sell any more LUCKY STRIKE plants. As we have 
not one-tenth enough of these plants thi.s year to fill our orders. 



PRICES OP LUCKY STRIKE PLANTS 

25 50 100 200 250 300 400 500 
Plants Plants Plants Plants Plants Plants Plants Plants 



1000 
Plants 



$2.00 $3.00 $5.00 $9.50 $12.00 $14.00 $16.00 $18.00 $30.00 



^llU0i^ 



Townsend's 

Genuine 

100 Per Cent 

Mastodon 




There's a Reason VThy Our Customers Increase 
Their MASTOSOIT Planting- Each Year 

We do not have to tell our customers how 
good MASTODON is, or put on a circus style 
of advertising in order to sell all the plants 
we can grow. 

We have never made claims as big as some 
growers do, such as 18 berries fill a quart, and 
lots of other stuff. But our customers come 
back year after year and buy our plants, tell- 
ing us that we produce the best MASTODON 
plants they have ever seen. Season 1929 we 
had sixty acres planted to MASTODON. Long 
before the season was over we were returning 
money and turning down orders by the hun- 
dred of thousa.nds of plants. 

Growers who houg^ht MASTOSOIT in hundred 
lots three years ag-o are now huying- them in 
lots of several thousand. 

Crop of MASTODON plants are very short this year, owing to the 
extremely hot and dry season. This applies to all other varieties of 
everbearing plants, as well as most of the standard varieties. 



PROGRESSIVE Everbearing 



— Was the first real 
_ everbearing strawberry 
and for a long time was highly advertised and spoken of. Since the intro- 
duction of such varieties as Lucky Strike and Mastodon it is not so largely 
planted. Fruit is small to medium size, of excellent quality. Recommend- 
ed only for home use at this time. It is a good strong grower and pro- 
duces a good quality of berries on good rich moist garden soil. 




Money Saving Collections for the Home Gardens 



A Favorite Garden Collection 

No. 6 

\\'ill furnish all the fruit that you wish for 
the table: canning; preserving; with an extra 
surplus to sell. These varieties are noted for 
their producing- qualities, fruiting from early 
to late. 



100 PREMIER Extra Early. . , 

100 BIG JOE Medium Late. . . 

100 TOWN KING Very Late.. 

50 MASTODON Everbearing.. 



ONLY 

$6.85 

Free 
Delivery 



Catalogue Value $7.60 



Home Garden No. 7 

This Garden consists of varieties that will 
produce a wonderful crop of Big Red Berries 
from early In the spring, and will also give 
you extra fruit on the Everbearing the fol- 
lowing fall. An extraordinary value. Per- 
fectly hardy, will fruit anywhere. 

50 Blakemore $1.50 ") ONTiY 

50 Luptou 80 tf»[- QC 

50 Aberdeen 1.50 > ipO.OD 

50 Big- Joe 80 Free 

25 Iiuclcy Strike Everljearinff. 2.00 J Delivery 
CATAIiOGUi: VAXUE $6.60 



Townsend's Own Choice Strawberry Collection No. 11 



We .tre making this collection of 500 plants owing to the 
each year send in their order and leave the selection to us. 
making these collections, se- 
lecting varieties adapted to 
their soil and climate, saving 
our customers a considerable 
amount of money each year 
Where no special varieties are 
wanted, we advise this collec- 
tion for all. Kindly advise u? 
if for home use or market pur- 
pose, or both. 

100 Best Extra Early 
100 Best Early 
100 Best Medium to Late 
100 Best Late 
100 Best Very Late 
CATALOGUE VALUE $7.00 

Two Collections: 

1000 Plants .... $8.00 

Pree Delivery. 



fact that thousands of our 

We at all tini. > ^ i ^^ , •; i i : 



customers 
value in 





The Women Folks Are Making- A 
Success in Growing Strawberries. 



A Garden Fit For a King, No. 5 

AI.I. NEW^ VAI.UABI.I: VARIETIES 

100 MASTODON Everbearing i Special 

100 TOWNKING Very Late Collection 

100 ABERDEEN Medium Late f- Price 

100 PBEMIEB Extra Early ffl»Q Q C 

100 BLAKEMORE Medium Early J «I!'*'.OiJ 

CATALOGUE VALUE, $11.30 PREE DELIVERY 

Our Spare Time Garden, No. 10 

PRODUCES PROM EXTRA EARLV TO VERY LATE 

We have combined tliese tine \arieties for the man or wo- 
man who has a little spare time during the day for outdoor 
work. With a little attention and proper care one can realize 
a tremendous profit from this Garden, .and will in no way 
interfere with your regular work. A garden that will produce 
fine rich red berries that will be easy to dispose of. 

200 PREMIER 1 

200 DR. BUBBILL I ^Pf?'*^ 

200 BIG JOE or GIBSON r a ^* — 

200 TOWNEING | $§ 25 

200 PORD or GANDY J ^ * 

CATALOGUE VALUE, $11.25 PREE DELIVERY 



A Garden of Big Berries, No. 1 



These varieties are of the very best 
quality and will please you in every re- 
spect; a collection exceptionally fine for 
shortcake and canning; covers season of 
ripening from early to late. 



1 



100 PREMIER Extra Early 
100 ABERDEEN Medium Early ' 
100 BIG JOE Medium Late I 

100 CHESAPEAKE Very Late I 

CATALOGUE VALUE . . $5.90 J Pree 



SPECIAL 
PRICE 

$5.00 

Delivery. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



13 



66 



What One Neighbor Tells Another 
Sells Townsend's Plants" 



The many millions of plants pmchased from 
us are never sold by us. They sold themselves. 
Once our plants are started in a section of the 
country, they sell themselves by one neighbor 
telling another of the Avonderful plants we send 
out. More than ninety per cent of our business 
comes from repeat orders, and from new business 
where our friends and customers have recom- 
mended our plants. This makes us doubly 
anxious to please our old friends. 

For thirty-one years we have kept the faith of 
our customers. It has always been oiu- aim to 
keep a step ahead of our nearest competitors. 
By originating and introducing new varieties. 
By using the most up-to-date methods in grow- 
ing our crops as well as handling the crop after 
it is grown and getting it into the hands of our 
customers in the best order possible. 

The Townsend's Plant Farms contains nearly 
2,000 acres of the most ideal soil in the country 
for growing strong, healthy plants. We have an 
organization not surpassed by any in the country 
for handling this immense business. 

Some of the varieties that we originated and 
introduced to the public. In 1908 we introduced 
the Missionary variety to the Southern states. 
This variety has made millions of dollars to the 
Florida growers, say nothing of what it has 
meant to the rest of the Strawberry world. It 
was as predicted by us at the time — the one 
ideal strawberry for the South. Next we orig- 
inated the Townsend's Big Late. This variety 
has made good in almost every section where a 
late variety was wanted. Later we originated 
the Ford, which has won thousands of friends 
owing to its good quality, high productiveness, 
and being almost frostproof. Next the World's 
Wonder, a late variety, was introduced as being 
the largest late variety of strawberries. Follow- 
ing this we introduced ■"Townking,' which today 
stands at the top of the list as the best late 
variety of strawberries. "May-queen" followed, 
being our own origination. And which gives 
promise of being a valuable late variety. In the 
Everbearing class, we liaA-e originated one worth- 
while variety. That is our •■Lucky-Strike." In 
our opinion, this is the most valuable variety of 
strawberries ever sent out, not only as an ever- 
bearer but as a producer for the spring crop. 



But after introducing all the above good va- 
rieties, which have meant so much to the Straw- 
beri'y World, we were not satisfied. And this 
time we are oflfering the supreme efforts of the 
leading Horticulturist of the United States. A 
man who has already given to the strawberry 



world the most popular of all varieties of straw- 
berries. Namely, the HOWARD 17 (versus 
Premier). Mr. Everett C. Howard, of Belcher- 
town, Mass., is the man. And the new introduc- 
tion which we have the honor to introduce under 
a contract with ^Ir. Howard. The variety being 
patented under the patent laws of the United 
States. A law recently passed by the Congress 
and Senate of the United States and signed by 
President Hoover in May, 1930. This patent 
protects the originator, the introducer, as well as 
the public for a period of seventeen years. 

This variety is rightfuUv named "HOWARD'S 
SUPREME." 

This variety has been under test since 1909 
with the various State Colleges and bears the 
endorsements of many of the leading Horticul- 
turists of the country. 

Howard's Supreme has won the praise of all 
who have eaten it. Quality equal to the grand 
old marshall. Experts have classed it not only 
the best for home use, but that it is sure to be- 
come a great favorite with the commercial grow- 
ers. Owing to its firmness, great productiveness, 
as well as one of the verj- best hardy growers. 
From the various reports at hand it would seem 
that it is not particular as to soil or climate. 
We therefore recommend it for trial to all our 
friends. And predict a great future for Howard's 
Supreme. 

JUPITER is being introduced this time as an 
ideal mate for Howard's Supreme. We have 
great faith in this variety, and any one can test 
it out on our guarantee to be as represented. 
There is no plant catalogue that has ever carried 
so valuable a list of varieties as this one. With 
such varieties to select from as Howard's Su- 
preme. .Jupiter, Fruitland, Aberdeen, Premier, 
Blakemore in the early to medium varieties, and 
with "Townking," Mayqueen, Chesapeake, Ford 
and Biglate as late varieties, success is almost 
assured from the start. _Many_of. these varieties 
are patented and copyrighted under the laws of 
the^ United States and can be secured only from 
our nurseries. This means your protection a? 
well as ours. Under the new law just passed by 
Congress and signed by President Hoover, it is 
impossible for the "Jip" nurseryman or dealer 
to advertise our new introductions and fill the 
orders with any kind of a variety he can secure. 
The new law making it possible for any grower 
to patent his oi'iginations of plants, same as is the 
custom with manufactures to patent their inven- 
tions for protection. We shall always strive to 
keep these varieties in stock, true to name, grown 
right, and priced right. 



^ 



Newark, Ohio, August 17, 1929. 
Gentlemen:— Your Raspberry stock sent us year 1928 was 
received in fine condition, and we were more than pleased 
with the results of the NEW KATHERINE variety, as It 
gave us a nice crop of berries, and at this writing is loaded 
with berries and blossoms. We are selling direct to our 
friends who are only too glad to get berries of extra quality, 
and willing to pay a fancy price for them. You may look 
for another order from us next spring. 

MR. M. S. ETTERS. 



Franklyn Furnace, Ohio, April 7, 1930. 
E. W. Townsend & Sons Nurseries, 
Salisbury, Maryland. 

Gentlemen : 

Received the 1900 plants in fine order, do not think I will 
loose a single plant. I want to thank you for the fine 
plants as well as lots of extras. 

Very truly yours, 

MR. EUGENE STEWART. 



14 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



ilRASPBERRIES 



One Setting Is Good for Years; Therefore Demand THE BEST 
STOCK When Starting Your Young Fields 

RED RASPBERRIES 

The Red Raspberries lill in very 
nicely on the small fruit farm. 
Coming into bearing just after the 
Strawberry crop is over, and be- 
fore the Black caps start, they are 
very easily grown. With rather 
stiff land their home, where they 
will produce great quantities of 
berries the following summer after 
set. Plants should be set 3 feet in 
the row, spacing the rows 6 feet 
apart, where they may be allowed 
to make a hedgelike growth, pro- 
ducing more fruit each year as the 
new canes form. One setting is 
good for several years. 

Complete Cultural Guide sent 
with each order. 



New Varieties 




VIKINO — The 
New Bed Basp- 
■berry With Out- 
standing Merits. 



THF CHIFF ^'^^^' Introduction). Origi- 
1 111- y^iiiL^i. j^^j.p^j ,^^. ^,^g Minnesota 

State Fruit Breeding Farm, being a selection 
from among 4.000 seedlings of the Latham. It 
possesses many of the good qualities of the 
Latham, some of them to even a greater degree 
than the parent. The main point of difference 
being in season of ripening, CHIEF IS TEN TO 
TWELVE DAYS EARLIER TO RIPEN than 
Latham, thus giving us a profitable berry for 
early market. Close inspection work has found 
the Chief so resistant to mosaic that fruit grow- 
ers can plant this variety and be sure of having 
healthy plants. It is also free from mildew and 
other diseases, making it an outstanding early 
red Raspberry. 

Prices: 6 Plants, $1.50; 12 Plants, $2.25; 
25 Plants, $3.75. 

VIKINO ^New Red). Originated at Vine- 
^ *'^**^^-* land, Ontario. A cross of the 
Marlboro and Cuthbert. Has been successfully 
grown both in Canada and the United States. 
and has proved a wonderful productive variety 
of the very highest quality. Price: 6 Plants, 
$1.75; 12 Plants, $2.50; 25 Plants, $4.50. 

Rathman ^^^'^ Red). Fruit of bright red 
color : fine quality : vigorous 
grower and heavy producer ; same season as 
Cuthbert. Fruit much larger and more produc- 
tive than the Cuthbert. A trial planting will 
convince you of the money-making qualities of 
this new Red. 



Everbearing Reds 

KATHERINE Everbearing Red — 

— The best Red Everbearing Raspberry 
that we have ever grown. Like its parent 
(The St. Regis) it is a persistent producer 
from early spring to late fall. Berries very 
large and of firm (juality. Prices — 12 for 
$2; 25, $4; 50, $6; 100, $8. 

St. Regis Everbearing Red-Market 
° gardeners and fruU grow- 
ers are making plenty of money from St. 
Regi.s, which will produce a crop 80 days 
after setting, and also another fine crop in 
September. It succeeds on all soils, light 
or heavy. Canes absolutely hardy, produc- 
ing large quantities of delicious fruit; a 
valuable variety for m a r k e t or home 
garden. 

For Prices RASPBERRY PLANTS, 

See page 29. 
TOWNSEND'S RED RASPBERRY 
PLANTS ARE PROFIT MAKERS 



Towaco, N. J., March 15, 1929. 
Gentlemen: — We wish to thank you for the fine looking 
Raspberry Plants received from you. Healthier looking 
stock I have never seen, and if we do not make a success 
with them it will not be your fault. I have recommended 
you to Mr. Sewell, who is ordering 2,000 LATHAM from 
you today. Yours truly, 

MR. N. LARSON. 



Red Raspberry Varieties Continued Next Page. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



15 



Red Raspberries Continued 



I A "TIJ A 1^ RED — Hardy, vigorous grower; 
productive; long fruiting sea- 
son. A sensational new variety. A^new Red 
Raspberry that is winning great merits wherever 
it is grown, its merits having spread throughout 
the Middle and Eastern f^tates. The high yield- 
ing ability is due largely to its resistance to 
mosaic and other raspberry diseases. It is known 
for its hardiness and producing an abundance of 
the highest quality fruit: ripens evenly and holds 
up well throughout the season. Everyone inter- 
ested in raspberries should give this variety a 
trial, as the northern agricultural colleges speak 
very highly of it. 



CUTHBERT 



RED — An old-standing va- 
riety that can be depended 
in for a good crop of fine fruit, in most sections 




of the country. Bushes hardy and vigorous; 
does best in sandy loam. Berries retain their 
brightness long after picked ; therefore affording 
long distance shipping. 
I-Tg|>KAff Red — Rich highly flavored berries; 

being recognized as the most hardy 

variety ever introduced; being grown extensively 
in the Northern States. 

I^irig- f? Afl — One of the earliest varieties of 

M Reds : plants very hardy and a 

wonderful producer of firm red berries of the 
highest quality ; very easily picked and ripens 
about one week ahead of any other variety. Going 
into the market when prices are at the highest 
- — a profitable variety to plant. 

Black Raspberries 

Complete Cultural Guide of Small Fruit Plants Sent With 
Each Order, or Will Gladly Mail to Anyone Asking for It 

CUMBERLAND — ^" hardiness and produe- 

tiveness it is unexcelled by 

any otlier variety ; in spite of the enormous size the fruit 
is very firm and will stand long shipments. Bush very 
healthy and vigorous, well adapted to supporting their 
large crop of berries ; midseason variety. 

— Best variety for home use ; fruit 
large and of a sugary flavor. 
BLACK DIAMOND — A very hardy and prolific northern 
variety, grown extensively for local markets, owing to 
its high quality, flavor and attractive fruit. 

— The new Black Cap which is becoming the 
leading commercial variety. Growers in Ohio 
and Eastern Half of States have practically given up all 
other varieties of Black Caps. In comparison with Cum- 
berland it is more disease-resistant; larger berry; earlier; 
better flavored and more productive. We invite your 
order early as our stock of this variety is limited. 

■ — Is considered by large 
growers to be the best early 
Black Cap variety. Strong, vigorous, upright grower; 
healthy and very productive. Will withstand drought and 
cold. Berries very juicy, large and attractive. This va- 
riety will please you. 



Honey Sweet 



Logan 



PLUM FARMER 



Purple Raspberries 



Pi'brous-Booted Plants that will please you. 

The Purple Raspberries are produced in the same way as the Black Caps and are grown exten- 
sively in the home garden, as they are unexcelled for canning, making jams or serving for dessert. 



Leading 
commer- 



COLUMBIAN PURPLE 

cial variety of the purple type berries, fairly 
firm, dark purple, and a sprightly flavor : vigor- 
ous and productive. 



Cardinal Purple 



— This new variety is 
not only a novelty but 
a berry of great merit. It has a growth of 10 
feet and produces in proportion, pure flavored 
berries of a choice purple. We recommend this 
for every backyard grower. You will be pleased. 




RASPBERRIES 



BLACKBERRIES 



DEWBERRIES 



We have gi-own this year a nice supplj' of vigorous, stocky transplants, of the leading varie- 
ties suite for the garden, of Raspberry, Blackberry and Dewberry Plants. This stock was trans- 
planted last spring using strong No. 1 canes, and have been grown by us throughout the summer 
and fall, making an extra large plant that will fruit much earlier after setting and giving a larger 
crop the first season picked. Our customers wishing to get an advanced start in their garden will 
find this stock just the thing. For Prices see Transplanted Stock in Price List on Page 29. 



i6 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



Grape Vines 




Plant Grape Vines for PLEASURE and PROFIT 

No home planting is complete without Grape Vines, and lots of ready cash 
can be made on the farm by planting- a thousand vines in some out-of-the-way 
place that is not paying expenses. Just try it. The Grape is easily grown and 
produces large returns for the time and effort expended. Our long growing 
season here on the Eastern Shore produces vines with a vigorous root system, 
which makes our vines transplant easily, and assures our customers of getting 
strong healthy fruit canes in a very short time after setting. 

AOAWAM — &ed. A large grape, ripening with Concord. Sweet, with rich aro- 
matic flavor. A rank grower, and very productive. One of the most reliable of 
Rogers Hybrids. 

f^SktsttAT\\Sk — J^s*' One of the latest grapes, and for this reason should be 
>^**^d"' tia planted in every garden and every vineyard to prolong the sea- 
son. Size large, firm and sweet. 

/^|^'M(^/^D'rj — Comes first with everybody. It is a sure, hardy grower, 
^^^>-'^~^^^^*^*--' and a great producer on any soil or climate. You can 

; make no mistake in planting" largely to Concord. If you 

are in a hurry to grow some grapes, order some of our bearing age Concord, 
and you will have only a few months to wait. Color blue, bunches very compact, 
second early. The most extensively planted grape in America. (See inside back 
cover page for Concord bearing-age vines.) 

The standard of excellence. Bunch and berry medium 
mpact. Flesh juicy, very sweet. Ripens early. Vinos very 
hardy and productive. Requires good, rich soil. 

— Black. A seedling of the Concord, but ripens a little earlier. 
Bunches very large. Will equal Concord in quality. Valuable 
for garden and vineyard. 

___ — White. A magnificent grape, and very valuable for both garden 

**•<* and vineyard. Berries large, with tough skin, quality very good. 

Ripens fairly earlj'. Rank grower; very productive. Popular 



Delaware co^ 



MOORE 



Niag 



Xorth and South. 

WOKDEN — Black. A Concord seedling. Ripens a little ahead of Concord. Good 

quality and productive. Extra good for home use. 



Our Special No. 8 Vineyard Collection 

Bach and every home should have a few Grape Vines; and to help any- 
one who is not familiar with the varieties, we will select vines for you 
that will prove satisfactory in your section. 

2 Best 2-7ear Black Orapes ( SPECIAXi 

2 Best 2-year Blue Orapes J PBICE, 

2 Best 2-year Red Grapes | ©O 25 

2 Best 2-year wmte Orapes ^ ^ 

CATAI.OOirE VALUE, $2.70 — FBEE DELIVEBY 



The FIVE NEW GRAPES With Outstanding Quality 

f^ \f^f\ — The new red grape that is giving promise of becoming the leading Red variety. On 
V^.^^^vy our farms this year it was an outstanding variety, both as to flavor and size of fruit — 

holding fruit well after ripening. Price— a.yr. vines, 60c each; 3-yr. -vines, $1.10 each. 

FRFTIOMIA — Originated at N. T. State Agr. Exp. Sta. Black; ripens very early; berries 
■*^ *^*-"*-' V^l^l./^ large, juicy and sweet, borne in large compact clusters; bunches are compact 

and very attractive. Price^2-yT. vines, 75c each; 3-yr. vines, $1.25 each. 

ONTARIO 



originations. 



WHITE. Follows Portland very closely in ripening. An excellent blending of 
acid and sugar; hence the taste is sprightly and yet sweet. Vines strong, vigor- 
ous growers and very productive. Another of the N. T. State Agr. Station's 
Price — 2-yr. vines 75c eaob; 3-yr. vines, $1.25 each. 



PORTLAND 



— N'ew white grape developed by N. Y. State Experiment Station. Ripens 
earlier than any other known grape. Berries large and have that beautiful 

yellow color like the Niagara. Contains so much sugar that it can be eaten 

long before it is fully ripe. Price— B-yr. vines, 75c each; 3-yr. vines, $1.25 each. 

Cl_II7Dipj A M Is the most promising new grape for commercial growers to compete with Cali- 
^t^M-tM^tUJ^L^ fornia vineyards. It is a late bluish black grape; large and more attractive 

than Concord, and is superior in keeping qualities. Fruit is produced in large 

handsome clusters, and many of them on each vine. "We recommend this Grape to all our customers 
in Uie Middle Atlantic. Price — S-yr. vines, 75c each; 3-yr. vines, $1.25 each. 



BEARING AGE GRAPES 



We have a considerable number of calls from our customers wanting bearing-age vines other than Con- 
cord, which we have been growing for several years. This year we top-pruned and reset a supply of 3- 
Tear stock under irrigation. They produced a nice crop of fruit in the Nursery row this summer and 
we are passing them along under our Bearing-Age Vines. Stock that will produce results the first year 
set. We can furnish all varieties at 214 times the Two-Year Size prices. 



Tin 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



17 



Townsend's Blackberry Plants 



FROM ROOT CUTTINGS 

We do not sell any sucker plants, as our experience 
with them is far from satisfactory — when compared with 
plants grown from Root Cuttings, which produce much 
stronger canes, and far better quality fniit. Demand 
the best and order Root Cuttings of Blackberry Plants 
from Townsend's. Our stock is well rooted and will 
please you. Let us reserve your order for Spring Plants. 



ALFRED 



— Recent introduction : midseason fruit- 
ing, extremely large big black berries. 

practically free from seeds and coreless; very sweet and 

juicy. 

QWY^FJ? — One of the old favorites that is pop- 

ular on account of its high quality and 

early ripening. 

EARLY HARVEST -Earnest to ripen and 

most productive of the 

early varieties, and demands the top of the market. We 
offer only selected strain of this variety. 



-Most valuable variety for mar- 
ket or home use. Rich flavor with 



ELDORADO 

but little core. Finest quality of the Blackberry family. 

[Vlacatawa ~T^e large jet black berries are sweet. 
juicy, entirely coreless, almost seedless. 

BEST OF ALL 

Blackberry that has been grown in the sandy soil 
section of New Jersey and, as stated by the N. J. 
Agric. Station, is very resistant to Orange Rust; 
outyielding all other blackberries that have been 
tried there. It will pay the Blackberry grower 




Alfred. 



(Known as Russell 
B. B. in N. J.) A new 



to order some of these plants, in which our stock 
is being supplied you direct from original plant. 

MERSEREAU — Early, very hardy; needs no 
protection whatever: canes strong and upright 
in growth; exceptionally sweet in flavor: with- 
out core. Not quite as early as Early Harvest. 



(See Page 29 for Prices on B. B. Plants) 

Dewberries, Selected Varieties 



Young Dewberry or Youngberry 

This is not a novelty but a genuine money- mak- 
ing variety. Said to be 
a cross between the Lo- 
ganberry and the Dew- 
berry. A strong hardy 
plant grower. Should be 
grown in rows 8 feet 
wide each way. M'^ill 
produce great quantities 
of large size good qual- 
ity fruit. Color a dark 
wine, with a pleasing 
taste. Sells for big 
money on all markets 
that have received the 
fruit. Can be grown in 
any part of the country. 
Strictly hardy. Set 

plants this spring and 
harvest a full crop the 
following summer. 
Fruits a long season and 
is worthy a trial. Price 
of plants: 6 for 2.50; 
12, $4.50; 25, $8.00; 
100, $25; More than 
100 plants at 100 rate. 




Toiuir SewlMrrT. 



Folks are just beginning to realize the great 
value of dewberries both for profit and home 
consumption. Their large size and sweet 
flavor combined with their soft texture make 
them unexcelled. They can be planted in any 
soil, but prefer light sandy soil; placing them 
in rows 4 feet apart, spacing them 3 feet 
down the rows. They have a trailing habit, 
but can be cut off each year after fruiting 
and will produce new wood each year, which 
will increase in production for several years 
after setting with very little attention. 
Aire I IT — That is a cross between the 

Austin and Lucreatia made on 

our farms and has the habit of both parents. 
One of the largest and sweetest dewberries 
grown as well as the most prolific. Easily 
grown and with a light mulch : is hardy in 
the Northern states. Ripens very early. 
A iietiM — This variety is earlier than the 

Lucreatia but somewhat softer; 

is a good variety for the market gardener, 
bringing the attractive early prices. Fruit is 
very large and productive. 
Lucreatia^ — ^^^ standard variety for 
^ the South, also largely plant- 

ed in the North as it is very hardy ; fruit 
large and firm ; will stand long distance ship- 
ping. Ripens one week later than Austin. 

SEE PAGE 29 FOB SEWBEBBY PRICES 



iR 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



TOWNSEND'S CHOICE 
ASPARAGUS 

Being the first vegetable to come in the Spring always 
brings a high price on the markets. Stocks being delicious 
and very healthful, every garden should have a generous 
supply, and when properly set and cared for will last n 
lifetime. Set in trenches 10 inches deep and 4% feet 
apart; spacing in rows by spreading out 12 to 15 inches 
apart, cover with aboxit 4 inches of soil and work addi- 
tional soil around plants as they grow out. Very easily 
grown and any surplus can readily be sold to the neighbors. 
Big profits are being made on beds of no more than one-half 
acre. (5000 plants will set an acre.) 



MARY WASHINGTON 



— A strain selected 
from the Washing- 
ton variety: much heavier stocks and greater producer than 
the original Washington variety. Practically frost-resistant. 

Martha Washington — ^ ^f^^^ yielding strain 

2 producing uniform 1 o n t; 

tender shoots: grows very rapidly. An excellent variety 
for market gardener or home use. 



PALMETTO 



large, tender and juicy. 



— An old variety ; preferred by many 
commercial growers : stocks very 



Barr^s Mammoth 



sixo: vei-y juicy and 



— A variety 
fine quality. 
of excellent flavor. 



of exceptionally 
Stocks of great 




Mary "Washing-ton. 




PEDIGREED WASHINGTON ^^^ Sy !;^!r,,^7 

roil, liaving been sele<:-ted for its large stocks of bluish green, and rust- 
resistance qualities. One of the best varieties of Asparagus. 



Prices of Asparagus Roots 

Extra Strong Selected Crowns — One, Two and Three^Year 



2b. 

Mary Washington, 1 year $ .75 

Mary Washington, 2 year 1.00 

Mary Washington, 3 year 1.50 

Martha Washington, 1 year 75 



Martha Washington, 2 
Martha Washington, 3 
Pedigreed Washington, 
Pedigreed Washington, 

Palmetto, 1 year 

Palmetto, 2 year 



year 1.00 

year 1.50 

1 year 1.00 

2 year 1.50 

SO 

80 

SO 

80 



100. 

$1.75 
2.50 
3.00 
1.75 
2.50 
3.00 
2.50 
3.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 



250. 

$3.50 
5.00 
6.00 
3.50 
5.00 
6.00 
5.00 
6.00 
3.00 
4.00 
3.00 
4.00 



Sizes 

1000. 

$10.00 

16.00 

20.00 

10.00 

16.00 

20.00 

16.00 

20.00 

8.00 

12.00 

8.00 

12.00 



Myatt's Uuna^us 



Barr's Mammoth, 1 year 

Barr's Mammoth, 2 year 

500 Plants at 1000 rate. Ask for special prices on lots of 5000 or more. 

Asparagus Ijy Parcel Post, add 10c for each 25 plants for postage. 

Asparagus Seed 

_ (One ounce will plant 60 feet of drill; S lbs. per acre) 

i hree pounds of seed will produce enough roots to transplant one acre. 

1 lb. 3 lbs. 5 lbs. 10 lbs. and up. 

Mary Washington $1.50 $3.75 $5.75 $1.00 

Martha Washington 1.50 3.75 5. 75 1.00 

Palmetto I.OO 2.75 4.00 .75 

CHOICE RHUBARB 

Myatt's Linnaeus r';""* \'"'f" "V'" '"«'■, »"' »' "■? '■?"' 

best to plant: makes good sauce and pies. 

Plants 20 each; $2.00 doz.; $8.00 per 100. Prepaid. 

QUEEN — Extra strong grower of large stocks of a pink color; for cook- 

' ing in any way its quality is unsurpassed. Plants 20c each; $2.00 doz.; 

BJiutoarT). $8.00 per 100. Prepaid. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



19 



"Walks and Talks with Berries" 

COMPLETE CULTURAL GUIDE ON SMALL FRUITS SENT FREE WITH EVERY ORDER 



THERE are so many different methods of growing 
Strawberries that it is useless to set down any 
special rule for our customers. Most any soil 
that will grow good garden truck will produce good 
berries. Strawberries usually grow well after garden 
crops, also Potatoes. Soy Beans and Cow Peas. It is 
best to plow land late in the fall or very early in 
spring, and work over lightly with smoothing har- 
rows just before plants are set. 

Any method of setting plants is all right, just so 
the roots are set straight and same depth they were 
grown. Every plant should be practically level with 
the soil after being set out. Often and very shallow 
cultivation is the rule, keeping all weeds and grass 
out during the entire growing season. 

PREPARING THE SOIL 

I am a believer in fall plowing for strawberries as 
well as for other truck crops. For the following rea- 
sons — First: Fall plowed land throws up near the 
surface lots of insects and their eggs that are 
freezed out during the winter, and which can not 
harm the coming crops. Second: Land plowed in 
the fall can be got into a better mechanical condi- 
tion in the spring, and will hold more moisture 
during summer months than spring plowed soil. 
\\'hen the land is plowed in the fall we top work it 
with harrows in spring. Do not replow unless the 
soil is a kind that runs together hard during winter. 
In this case it is often better to replow in spring. 

Thousands of times I am asked as to best fertilizer 
and methods of applying same for strawberries on a 
soil that has already been made rich by growing 
other crops. Land that has been heavily broadcasted 
the year before and some other truck crop grown 
will be in ideal condition to plant strawberries the 
following spring. 

'\\'here this kind of a site is not handy and the 
soil needs manuring, the next best way is to broad- 
cast the land before harrowing in spring. Any good 
home raising manure that is not too coarse will be 
better than any fertilizer. Namely: Fine manure 
from the cow barn, hog pens, chicken house, wood 
ashes, any the above by themselves or a mixture, 
will do the trick without any commercial fertilizer. 

Next — If none of this is handy, we must look to 
commercial fertilizer. My first choice is raw bone 
meal. I name this because it will not injure the 
plants even if applied directly under them. (It is 
very slow in showing results.) Bone acts slow but 
will come along In time to produce a good fruit bud 
and is sure to be profitable. WTiere bone is used in 
spring application I recommend a balanced fertilizer 
as a top dressing in September. This should be 
applied when vines are dry and brushed off the 
plants, preferable just before a rain. When the fall 
application is made. I do not like to follow this with 
a spring application, as some growers prefer. My 
reason for fertilizing in September is to grow^ a 
better fruit bud and crown, and to leave off the 
spring application because it makes the fruit soft. 
No variety will stand long distance shipping when a 
heavy application of high grade nitrogen fertilizer 
has been used in the spring. It is a little different 
on the old bed that has been carried over for one 
season. The old plants need a little nourishment in 
order to produce sufficient foliage to shade the ber- 
ries, but a 4-8-4 mixture and a light application is 
sufficient. 

METHODS OF SETTING PLANTS 

There are lots of methods and ways that are good. 
Just so the roots are placed in the ground in a fan 
shape the same depth they grew, and the earth is 
well packed around the plant leaving it practically 
level with the ground, it is well done. No matter 
if a horse drawn transplanter be used, or a garden 
spade, or trowel. In setting our hundred of acres 
we still bend our backs and set every plant by hand 
with a garden trowel. If the soil is in good condi- 
tion also the "back." a man with a good dropper can 
set an acre or 8.000 plants in a day. This is the 
usual day's work on our farms. 

We start the fine twelve-tooth cultivator (Planet 
Jr.) in a w'eek after plants are set. keeping the 
ground stirred with this every week during spring 



and summer. "WTien plants are set for hill cjilture 
they can be cultivated each way. When this plant 
is adopted a Kruegers Runner Cutter should be used. 
This tool cuts off all surplus runners and leaves a 
14-inch hill of plants; usually about eijght to ten 
plants grow up in this stool. Clean cultivation can 
be given the field without very much hand work, 
and the fruit is fifty per cent larger than when 
grown in the wide matted rows. And in most cases 
and with most varieties the hill system will produce 
more quarts. 

30 X 30 inches each way it requires 7.000 plants to 
set an acre. When set in rows 42 inches apart and 
plants set 18 inches in the rows, it requires 8,000 
plants to set an acre. When the matted row system 
is used the beds should not be allowed to mat too 
thick or the fruit will be small and disappointing. 
Chesapeake or "Townking" and some few other va- 
rieties can be grown in matted rows and almost left 
to themselves and will produce large handsome fruit. 
Mastodon or Luckv Strike everbearing do much bet- 
ter in hills. THE KRUEGERS RUNNER CUTTER 
CAN BE PURCHASED FROM OUR NURSERY 
ONLY. WE ARE SOLE DISTRIBUTORS AT THE 
REASONABLE PRICE OF ONLY $S.00. 

AS TO MULCHING STRAWBERRIES FOR 

WINTER PROTECTION 

Most any good straw material will do. Do not ap- 
ply too heavily, usually one inch thick is sufficient. 
and this should be raked between the rows very early 
in spring. When the mulching is left between the 
beds it protects the fruit from sand and keeps the 
moisture near the top. 

TIME TO PLANT STRAWBERRIES 

Early spring is the only real time, and the earlier 
the better, as a freeze after setting plants does not 
injure them. 

HOW TO PLANT 

If you order all perfect flowering varieties plant 
them in large plots just as they come. But if you 
order part imperfect flowering you should plant 
every third or fourth row to some perfect flowering 
sort of the same season (and there are some mighty 
fine imperfect sorts that should not be overlooked). 

Following each variety of strawberries in our price 
list, you w'ill note we have abbreviated the perfect 
and imperfect flowering varieties; namely. Per. and 
Imp., which will help our customers when ordering 
Imperfect varieties to following the above planting 
instructions. 

WHY EVERY HOME SHOULD HAVE A 
STRAWBERRY BED 

I have never yet met a person who did not like 
Strawberries. Strawberries are much better gathered 
fresh from the vines. Little money is needed to 
start a bed. 

The small kiddies, and the women folks will be 
glad to do most the hoeing and pulling grass. 

The kids especially like this, as they get all the 
big juicy berries they can eat while they are at 
work (when the big Everbearing varieties are 
planted). 

Many women are making their own spending 
money by planting an Everbearing Strawberry 
Garden every year. Returns come in quick after 
planting, and the profits are big. 

Good Strawberry patches help keep the boys and 
girls on the farm. 

Any good garden soil will produce Strawberries 
successfully. 

Nothing will help sell a farm like a good Straw- 
berry patch. 

Plant Strawberries between the rows of young 
trees. They will pay all the cost of bringing the 
young orchard into bearing. 

If you are convenient to a good road you should 
grow several varieties of Strawberries, enough to 
cover the entire season from June 1st to November 
15th; also other small fruits and flowers. 

The roadside stand makes a dandy market for 
fruits and flowers. TRY IT. 



20 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 




Cabbage Plants 



FIELD CROWN- 
WINTER HARDENED 




A Trial Order Will Convince You of Oar Quality. 

This year we have grown on our Farms in Mary- 
land a stock of flvo million Winter Hardened Cab- 
bage plants, which will be ready for shipment Feb- 
ruary the 15th. making daily shipments until April 
the 25th. We have had a favorable growing season 
in maturing these plants, and with our rigid selec- 
tion in sending only a well balanced plant to our 
customer, that they will please all who receive them, 
maturing a crop from a week to ten days ahead of 
the average plant sent out. 

Our Plants Free From Disease 

Due to the clean cultivation given our Cabbage 
plants during growing season, and the rotation of 
crops in preparing our fields for the growing of these 
plants, w-e have failed to find any of the diseases 
that generally prevail in the Cabbage Growing Sec- 
tions of the South. With the help of our State In- 
spectors we are constantly watching for any disease 
that might give our customers trouble after setting, 
and have found them free from all disease in every 
inspection made. 



Order Early 



Our customers have found in our plants a depend- 
able quality they have been looking for, and each 
year we find they increase their orders. Last year 
the demand was so great we were compelled to re- 
turn a considerable number of orders unfilled, as we 
do not ship any plants other than grown on our own 
farms, under our own supervision. These plants are 
selected in the field, and again at our packing house. 
An order will convince you that our plants are un- 
equal in size, root system and excellent crowns. 
Again we advise you to place order as early as pos- 
sible. 



COPEXTHAG-EIT MABKET— Planted with Early Jer- 
sey Wakefield — when the Wakefield is ready for mar- 
ket, the heads of this strain will be equally as good. 
If, however, the Copenhagen Market is allowed to 
grow' another ten days the yield per acre in tonnage 
will be almost double. It will remain longer on the 
field without bursting than any other early sort. 
EABI.Y JERSEY WAKEFIE!.!) — One of the earliest 
varieties of pointed head type, and extensively plant- 
ed for early market. The plants we offer of this ex- 
cellent variety will please the most critical trade. 
They are well hardened and should produce a crop 
ten days earlier than southern plants. 
G-OZiSEir ACKE — An early round-head variety of ex- 
cellent quality. Has few outer leaves, permitting 
close planting. It is a splendid variety for the mar- 
ket gardener. 

SXXOCESSZOIT — Is a large, solid, flat head variety 
that matures a little later than the Copenhagen Mar- 
ket, but makes an enormous yield, and is said to be 
one of the surest headers. 

DAHTSH BAIiZ>HEAS — L.arge heads, round and very 
solid. We are listing this variety for the benefit of 
our customers in the extreme north, where it can be 
grown through the summer months with wonderful 
success. 

CABBAGE FI.AKT PRICES 

50 Plants, 60c; 100 Plants, 85c; 200 to 400 Plants, 
60c i>er 100; 500 to 900 Plants, 50c per 100; 1,000 
Plants or over, 45c per 100. 

Iiarger quantities of 10,000 or more, write for 
Special Prices. 

If plants are wanted by Parcel Post, use same 
rate as for Strawberry Plants, found on page 28. 

Belvidere, N. J., March 12, 1930. 
E. W. Townsend & Sons, 
Salisbury, Md. 

Dear Sirs: — Book us for an additional 12,000 Early Jersey 
Wakefield. The last 15,000 being such stocky plants has 
encouraged us to set more. Please get these off at once, 
by Express. You will receive an order from my neighbor 
who saw my first lot of plants received from you. 

E. R. WILLIAMS. 



Lebanon, Penna., May 28, 1930. 
Gentlemen: — I have been purchasing my plants in the 
south during the past tew years, and gave you a trial order 
this year. When your plants came and comparison made of 
the plants I had been getting, I was convinced that I had 
been getting my plants from the wrong place. Your plants, 
although set out nearly two weeks later than a shipment 

received from , are now much larger and a 

perfect stand. Quite a few growers have asked me where 
I received these plants, and I am pleased to tell them of 
you; for we are in need of such plants that you send out— 
if we are to make any money from Early Cabbage. 
Sincerely yours, 

F. F. STEWART. 



Terre Haute, Ind., March 25. 1930. 
Gentlemen: — Please accept our thanks for the extra fine 
lot of Cabbage Plants sent us this year. We have them all 
set out and growing nicely. You can rest assured of our 
future orders. „„., . , „ 

R. c. McDonald. 



Hartford, Conn., April 6, 1930. 
Dear Sirs:— To say that I am more than pleased with my 
Cabbage Plants is putting it mildly. The plants arrived in 
wonderful condition, and I notice that you were quite gen- 
erous in your count. Your plants will be recommended to 

""' '"'"^'- FRANK ARTMORE. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



21 



FRUIT TREES 

We Recommend Express or Freight Shipments on Fruit Trees 




Kieffer Pear. 



Pear Trees 



Each 

3 to 4 ft., 2 year.$ .60 

4 to 5 ft., 2 year. .70 

5 to 6 ft., 2 year. .80 



1000 

$300.00 
400.00 
500.00 



10 100 

$5.00 $40.00 

6.00 50.00 

7.00 60.00 

BARTLETT — Season last of August to Septem- 
ber 1.5 til. Good strong grower, flesh is white, 
fine grained, luscious, large and buttery, has a 
rich «ielting flavor and is very sweet. 
CLAPP'S FAVORITE— Summer. Fruit large, 
lemon color, spotted with brown dots; flesh tine, 
rich and sweet. A very good one. 
DUCHESS — Strong grower, productive, not sub- 
ject to blight. Fruit large, light green patched 
with russet, melting, juicy, sweet and good. 
October and November. 

KIEFFER — Prolific. Abundant and regular 
bearer. Good shipper. Fruit large, color yelllow 
with red cheek. Will produce ten bushels of 
pears to the tree when ten years old, begins 
fruiting successfully when 3 years old. October. 
SECKEL — Medium size: skin rich yellowish 
brown with deep brownish red cheek when fully 
ripe; flesh very fine grained; sweet, exceedingly 
juicy melting butter. One of the richest and 
highest flavored pears known. Summer. 

Cherry Trees 

Each 10 100 

3 to 4 feet, 2 year $ .70 $6.00 $50.00 

4 to 5 feet, 2 year 80 7.00 60.00 

5 to 6 feet, 2 year 90 8.00 70.00 



Sweet Cherries 
BLACK TARTARIAN — Black; very large; rich 
and sweet; productive. Ripens last of Jtme. 
GOVERNOR WOOD — Yellow with red cheek; 
tender; rich; delicious; very fine; large; round- 
ish; depresses at stem; productive. Early. 
YELLOW SPANISH — Ripens early in June. 
Fruit large; color yellow. Tree vigorous grower. 

Sour Cherries 
EARLY RICHMOND — Medium to large; dark 
red: juicy; good flavor. June. 
ENGLISH MORELLO — Large size; color dark 
red; quality very good. Late. 
MONTMORENCY — Medium to large; dark red; 
juicy ; good flavor. Late. 

Plum Trees 

Each 10 100 

3 to 4 feet, 1 year $ .50 $4.00 $30.00 

4 to 5 feet, 2 year 60 5.00 40.00 

5 to 6 feet, 2 year 75 6.00 50.00 

ABUNDANCE — Fruit very large and showy ; 
flesh light yellow; exceedingly juicy, tender and 
sweet. A good market variety. 
BURBANK — Fruit very large; dark velvet red; 
flesh juicy and pleasant. Ripens middle of 
August. Productive. 

GREEN GAGE — Skin pale green ; excellent ; an 
old standard variety. 

GERMAN PRUNE — Dark purple or blue; juicy; 
rich : of best quality. September. 
SHROPSHRE DAMSON — Medium size fruit; 
produced in thick clusters or groups ; tree a 
strong grower; and very productive of dark pur- 
ple colored plums. October. 

Quince Trees 

Each 10 

2 year 4 to 5 feet $ .75 $6.00 

CHAMPION — Tree strong grower; produces a 
good crop every year. Fruit is large and of 
good quality. Cooks as tender as an apple. Oc- 
tober. 

BOURGEAT — Large, golden yellow, tine quality, 
tree healthy, a good one. 






Uontauorency Cberries. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



APPLES 




Delicious Apple. 



Year, 
Year, 
Year, 
Year, 



to 6 



feet, 
feet, 
feet, 
feet. 



Each 

.$ .35 

. .40 

. .50 

.55 



10 
$3.00 
3.25 
3.75 
4.75 



100 
$25.00 
27.50 
30.00 
35.00 



One to four trees or plants of one variety sold 
at the each rate; 5 to 30 of one variety at the 
ten rate; 30 to 250 of one variety at the 100 
rate; 250 or more at the 1,000 rate. 

BALDWIN — Large, roundish, skin deep red; 
llcsh juif.v. crisp, sub-acid, good tiavor; very 
vigorous and productive. The best all-round 
winter apple for New England and Xorthern 
Stales. Splendid keeper. December to March. 
DELICIOUS — Winter apple. Keeps well, color 
red and yellow; fine grained, and Quite juicy; 
flavor slightly acid, but very good. A good apple 
for either home use or market. 
(jRIMES GOLDEN — Very large, skin golden yel- 
low : flesh tender and crisp. A very good fall 
apple. Septemlter to January. Grown in all -sec- 
tions of the country. 

ROME BEAUTY — Large; roundish, slightly 
coiiicnl. with bright red on a pale yellow ground: 
tine iirnined. .iuicy. good quality. 
YORK IMPERIAL — A very good one; trees 
come into bearing early, and bear a good crop 
each year. Skin bright yellow covered with 
bright red and striped, very large. Suitable to 
anv part of the country. 

ST'aYMAN'S WINESAP — Also a seedling of 
Winesap: dark red. firm tlesh, fine grained, crisp, 
sub-acid: quality best: strong grower. 
MclNTOSH RED — A choice variety of the 
Fameuse type. A good annual bearer. Fruit 
above medium to large, highly perfumed; flesh 
snow white, crisp, very tender, slightly aromatic, 
sub-acid. 

WINTER BANANA — Fruit medium to large, 
smooth and handsome, golden-yellow usually 
shaded with red blush. One of the best dessert 
apples. 



PEACHES 

Each 10 100 

2 to 3 feet High $ .25 $2.00 $12.00 

3 to 4 feet Sturdy 30 2.50 15.00 

4 to 5 feet Trees 40 3.50 18.00 

BELLE OF GEORGIA — Kipens the ttrst to flf- 
teenth of August. Fnut is large, white with 
red cheek: flesh white, lirni. of excellent flavor. 
Tree a rapid grower and very productive. O.ie 
of the very best market soi'ts. Freestone. 

CARMAN — A very hardy peach, ripening about 
the miildle of .luly; skin pale yellow, with blusii 
on sunny side; flesh white, tender, sweet and 
melting. Shijis well. Best early market peach. 

CRAWFORD'S EARLY — Freestone. Large, ob- 
long, yellow with deep red cheek: llesh yellow, 
juicy and rich, excellent flavor. 

CRAWFORD'S LATE — Uipens after Elberta. 
Freestone. High iiuality aiul very liirge size: 
flesh deep yellow: skin yellow with a l)road dark 
red cheek. 

ELBERTA — Midseason. A valuable large peach, 
of good quality : fruit large, yellow with red 
cheek: juicy and extremely high flavored: flesh 
.\'ellow ; freestone. The leading market variety. 
Ripens here about the middle of August. 

GREENSBORO — Uipens from .Tune 2.5th to .July 
loth. Large: white with a red cheek: rich and 
melting: juicy: tree a strong grower. 

GOLDEN JUBILEE — A new variety originatCil 
by the New Jersey Experimental Station, and is 
of Flberta type, ripening with C.nrman and Belle 
of (ie(M-gia. Freestone. 

J. H. HALE — One of the best sorts for market 
or garden. Fruit is very large, round, quality 
excellent. Skin yellow Hnely colored, flesh yel- 
low, sweet and melting. Kipens just before the 
Klberta. A ver.v good one. 

ROCHESTER — Has the habits and characieris- 
tics of the Crawford ; but fully two weeks 
earlier; yellow freestone: good size: very sweet: 
fine flavor. Requires only half the usual amount 
of sugar for canning. Ripens middle July. 

" *\, 




Elberta Peaches. 



E. W. TOWNSENU 6^ SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



23 



Coniferous Evergreens 

All Coniferous Evergreens are Dug with a Ball of Earth and Wrapped in Burlap 




This photograph has been specially prepared hy us 
Everg'reens. The following is a key to each variety as 
(1) George Peabody Golden Arborvitae; (2) Norway 
vitae; (5) Tom Thumb Arborvitae; (6) Blue Spruce; 
Pfitzeriana; (10) Japanese Yew; (11) Juniper, Horlzo 
wood, Suffruticosa; (14) Hemlock Spruce; (15) Abelia 
(18) Irish Juniper; (19) Arborvitae, Aurea Compacta 
Veitchi; (22) Biota Aurea Nana; (23) Betinospora F 
Japonica; (26) Chinese Arborvitae; (27) Boxwood, Se 
shown above not listed in our catalogue. 

ARBORVITAES 

AMBBZCAN ASBOBVITAE (Thuja occidentalis) — 

Rather dwarf habit of growing'. Its foliage or leaves 
are flat instead of needle-like, and set on edge, color 
bright green. One of the most extensively planted 
of all evergreens. 12 to 18 inch size, 1.50 each. 
GZiOBE ASBOBVITAB (Thuja globosa) — A variety 
that is very handsome. In shape it is absolutely 
round or globular. Very dense in growth, and does 
not require shearing. 12 to 18 inch size, $1.50 each. 
FYSAUXDAIi ABB03VITAE (Thuja pyramidalis) — 
Its tall slender habit makes it splendid for formal 
use: a dense dark green columnar form. 12 to 18 
inch size, SI. 50 each. 

GOZiDBN ASBOBVXTAE (Biota anxea nana) — 
Conical form, very dense and compact. During 
spring and summer it presents the most cheerful 
bright-yellow-green imaginable, changing to old gold 
in autumn. 12 to 18 inch size, $2.00 each. 
COMPACTA ABBOSVITAE (Dwarf) — Dense little 
trees with light green foliage; neat and attractive; 
useful for beds, borders, cemeteries or low growing 
hedges. 12 to IB-inch size, $2.00. 

SPRUCE 

NOBWAY SPBTTCE (Picea excelsa) — Perfectly 
hardy. Hakes a beautiful compact growth. A choice 
ev-ergreen and more extensively planted than any 
other variety of evergreen. 12 to 15 inch, 65c each; 
15 to 18 inch, 85c each. 

COIiOBADO BZiXTB SPBTTCE (Pungens glauca) — Tall 
conical tree with ^-orlds of horizontal branches. 
Color of foliage silver-blue, but not near as distin- 
guished as Kosters Blue Spruce in color. 12 to 15 
inch size, $2.00 each. 

KTilVlTiOCK SPBirCE (Tsuga canadensis) — A grace- 
ful tree. Hardy, fine for most situations. Branches 
droop, making a striking appearance. 12 to 15 each 
size, 85c each. 

JUNIPERS 

ZBISH JTnnPEB — The trees form low, dense cones 
of silvery green. Xo lawn is complete without at 
least one of these trees. 15 to 18 inch size, 85c each. 



for the convenience of our customers in selecting their 

per number listed on ball and burlap of each tree: 

Spruce; (3) Globe Arborvitae; (4) Pyramidal Arbor. 

(7) Savin Juniper; (8) Juniper, Stricta; (9) Juniper, 

ntalis; (12) Juniper, Tamariscifolia; (13) Dwarf Box- 

Grandiflora; (16) Globe Privet; (17) Standard Privet; 

(20) Biota Orientalis; (21) Betinospora Squarrosa 

lumosa; (24) American Arborvitae; (25) Euonymus 

mpervirens. We will be be glad to quote on any stock 



JTTNIFEB PriTZEBlANA — Its sweeping, gray-green 
branchlets give this broad, bushy type value for 
mixed planting. 12 to 18 inch spread, $1.50 each. 
JUNIPEB (stricta) — The most beautiful and valu- 
able Juniper. Of broad pyramidal habit, densely 
clothed with bright metallic blue foliage. As hardy 
as an oak. 12 to 18 inch size, $2.00 each. 

Evergreens will be shipped by Express or Freight, 
depending on size of order and distance. 

RETINOSPORAS 

BETINOSPOBA PIitnyiOSA — Soft deep green, plume- 
like foliage. Strong grower. 
BETINOSPOBA PIiITMOSA AVBEA (Golden plume. 

like) — Soft light green, plume-like foliage, distinctly 

tipped with vellow. 

BETINOSPOBA SQTTABBOSA VEITCHI (Japanese 
retinospora) — Foliage silver blue. Stands clipping 
when used in hedges or for formal specimens. 

Prices on Betinosporas Iiisted: 15 to 18 inch size, 
$1.25 each. 

Broad Leaved Evergreens 

Leaves on Broad Leaved Evergreens are similar 
to leaves on any kind of trees except that they are 
more apt to be darker green and cling to the 
branches all winter long, therefore, they gain the 
name evergreen. Such evergreens are very beau- 
tiful, especially when planted with other varieties 
with needle type leaves, 

BTTSH ASBUTTJS (Abelia grandiflora) — Dwarf: 
glossy foliage. Flowers continuously from July till 
frost: arbutus-like pink. Use in masses. 15 to 18 
inch size, 75c each. 

AZALEA (amoena) — A dense dwarf-grow^ing ever- 
green shrub with slender branches and semi-double 
flowers of bright, cheerful, rosy purple; produced in 
such great numbers as to literally envelop the bush 
in April. 10 to 12 inch size, $1.75 each. 
AZAIiEA (hinodeglri) — Holds foliage during winter, 
blooms beautiful red flowers in early April com- 
pletely covering bush. 10 to 12 inch size, $2.25 each. 
BOXWOOD (Bvixus sempervirens) — Specially desired 
for planting as individual specimens on lawns or in 
tubs. Trimmed as pyramidal form. 8 to 10 inch size, 
balled and hurlapped, 65c each. 



24 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



Shade and Ornamental Trees 




Japanese Blood Zieaf Maple. 



SHADE TREES 

ZrOSWAY MAFIiE (Acer platanoides) — A large, 
handsome tree of spreading, rounded form, with 
broad, deep, green foliage. Very hardy, and ex- 
tensively planted. 6 to 8 feet, $1.75 eacb. 

OSTElTTAZf PIiAITE — Has a very wide round topped 
head, thick branches, rapid grower. A good one for 
either street or lawn planting. 6 to 8 feet, $1.25 each. 

SXIaVXB MAFZiE (Acer dasycarpnin) — Produces a 
quick shade. The leaves on top are light green, 
underneath the leaves are same shade as bright 
silver, and as the summer breeze approaches them, 
the silver and green flashes are very attractive. 
Extensively planted. 6 to 8 feet, 75c eacb. 



ORNAMENTAL and WEEPING TREES 

CATAZiFA BtnTG-EX (Umbrella Tree) — A pleasing 
lawn tree of formal appearance; no lawn is com- 
plete without this tree. Dwarf habit of growing. 
5 to 6 feet stems, $1.25 each, or $2.25 per pair. 

JAPANESE BIiOOD I.BAF UAPI.Zl>^Leaves ex- 
tremely bright red, also bark of the tree is red. 
Grows in shrub form, not for shade. Unquestion- 
ably, as an ornament for the lawn, it is without an 
equal. IV2 ft. size, $3.00; 2 ft. $4.00. 

JAPANESZ: WEEPTNG CTHEBBY — This tree is pro- 
duced by grafting a weeping variety on a natural 
cherry stock which has attained a height of about 
5 or 6 feet. Blooms early in spring. It makes a 
wonderful sight when in bloom. 5 feet stems, $1.25 
each. 

IiOMBABDY FOFZiAB — Makes fast growth, does not 
spread, a tall spire-like tree, altogether planted at 
the entrance of driveways, and to mark boundary 
lines. Unsurpassed for its purpose. 8 to 10 feet, 
8Sc each. 

WISC01TSXI7 WEEPING- WIIiIiOW — Forms a large 
round headed tree, one of the most elegant of all 
weeping or pendulous trees. "Will thrive in any 
locality. 6 to 8 feet, 85c each; 8 to 10 feet, $1.00 each. 



ORNAMENTAL FLOWERING TREES 

BECHTEI.'S DOUBLE ri.O"WEBIN(S CRAB — Suc- 
ceeds well in most soils. Flowers profusely in May. 
Tree appears to be covered with small delicate pink 
double roses of delirious fragrance. A moderati' 
grower. 3 to 4 feet, 75c each. 

BED FI.OWEBING DOGWOOD (Cornus florida 

ruljra) — A variety of the well-known flowering dog- 
wood, with rosy-pink flowers. Blooms May and 
.lune. $2.25 each. 

WHITE FI.OWEBII7G DOGWOOD — Similar to the 
red in liahit and growth bul has while flowers 
instead of red. 65c each. 

DOUBLE WHITE FLOWERING PEACH — Tree a 
stronger grower than Red Flowering Peach. Foliage 
very light green. During autumn months changes 
to cream white. Branches are white which makes 
this type very noticeable wherever planted. Early 
in spring the tree is covered with large double white 
blooms. 3 to 4 feet, 75c each. 

DOUBLE BED FLOWEBING PEACH — Foliage sim- 
ilar to other varieties of peach except leaves are 
smaller and darker green in color. Branches bright 
red. very ornamental in the winter. In early spring 
before leaves appear the branches are literally 
covered with bright red blooms about double the 
size of the regular peach bloom in commercial 
orchards. Very attrartive for any lawn or garden. 
3 to 4 feet, 75c each. 

PLUM, PUBFLE-LEAVED (Piianus Pissardl) — Pro- 
duces an abundance of pretty pink flowers in May. 
No fruit. Can be set alone if desired. However, 
more appropriately planted when set with flowering 
shrubs. Foliage purple and very attractive. 4 to 5 
feet, 85c each. 

DOUBLE FLOWEBING PLUM (Prunus triloba) — 

Produces double pink flowers in May about an inch 
in diameter, resembling a little rose. Usually grows 
to a height of about six feet. Very attractive. 3 to 4 
feet, 75c each. 

TULIP POPLAB — One of the grandest of our native 
trees, of tall, pyramidal habit, with broad, glossy, 
flddle-shaped leaves and beautiful, tulip-like flowers; 
allied to the Magnolia. 5 to 6 ft. $1.50. 




Silver Maple. 



All Shade and Ornamental Trees Will Be Shipped by Express or Freierht. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



25 



ROSES 



That Will Give You a Wealth of Bloom 

Note. — Customers wanting' Bose Bushes 'by mail, refer to Parcel Post rates on pag'e 28. 



TEA AND HYBRID TEA ROSES 





Columbia. 



Mrs. Aaron Ward. 



2-year plants, 75 each; $6.00 for 10. 

COLUMBIA (HT.)— Lively, bright pink, sweetly 
scented flowers of exquisite shape and strong, stiff 
petals, deepening- in color as they expand. Free 
flowering, good growth, and healthy foliage. 

HADIiEY (HT.) — A rich crimson-red flower with 
velvety texture, lovely form, and perfume. Moderate 
in growth and bloom. 

KAISEEIN AUGUSTE VICTOBIA (HT.) — Well- 
formed, creamy buds which develop slowly to 
blooms of absolutely perfect form, snowy white with 
a slight tint of lemon at center; fragrant. 

IiASV HILUNCJDON- (T.) — Clear apricot-yellow. 
Buds of remarkable qualify and elegance. 

IiA FBANCE — Rich satiny peach, changing to deep 
rose. Large. Sweetest of all everblooming. 

IiOS AKGEZ.es — Flame pink. Buds long and 
pointed. Beautiful from the opening of the bud until 
the last petal drops. 

MME. ESOTTABD HEBBIOTT— This is the Daily 
Mail Rose, made famous when it won the London 
Daily Mail Gold Cup. for the finest Rose at the 
famous London Rose Show. Color coral red. shaded 
with yellow and bright rosy scarlet. 

MISS I.OI.ITA AjyrOITB (HT.)— Burnished buds and 
creamy copper flowers with a reddish orange tinge; 
fuU.v double, cupped, and fragrant. 

MBS. AABON WABB — Dark yellow, almost orange. 
A beautiful variety. 

OPHEiaA — Cream white. 

PBEMIEB — Deep pink, fragrant and thornless. 

BADIAN-CE (HT.) — Lovely light silvery pink flow- 
ers, with beautiful suffusion of deeper color. It may 
be relied upon to produce flowers under all con- 
ditions. 

BED BAJDIANCE — A rose of merit, one that should 
be in every garden, flowers a deep red globular 
shape, a rose of true color, flowers hold their color 
until the last petal drops; it does not fade. 

SOTTVENIB DE CZ.&UDITTS PEBITET— A most 
vigorous grower of erect branching habit; long point- 
ed buds of exquisite shape, carried on long, stiff 
stems. Very large, full flowers with elongated deep 
petals. Color, striking sunflower-yellow, deeper in 
the center, without any color blending, and which is 
retained without fading in the warmest weather. 



HYBRID PERPETUAL ROSES 
2-year plants, 75c each; $6.00 for 10. 

The most satisfactory all-around class for sections 
where winters are cold, because with a cover of 
earth over the whole plant they will stand severe 
freezing weather. Hybrid Perpetual Roses are vig- 
orous and free blooming. 

AMEBICAir BEAUTY — Strictly a Hybrid Tea Rose, 
but usually classed as a Hybrid Perpetual owing to 
its vigorous growth. Beautiful carmine-red blooms, 
very large and double. 

FBAU KABZi DBUSCHKZ^ — A pure white variety 
with immense long buds and perfectly double flow- 
ers. Especially fine for bedding. It is the largest 
and strongest of all white Roses. 

GENEBAX JACQUEMHTOT — Everybody who loves 
roses will place this variety high on the list of 
extra-desirable kinds; a bright crimson with a de- 
lightfully sweet fragrance. 

PAUIi NETBOI? — Luminous cerise-red. One of the 
largest roses under cultivation. It is a strong, 
healthy grower with clean foliage of a rich green 
shade. An excellent Hybrid Perpetual Rose. 
UZiBICH BBUITITEB — Immense big blooms of a 
bright cherry-red shade with a lovely rich fragrance. 
Very free flowering and one of the finest for cutting. 
Ideal for trailing on a pillar. 

CLIMBING ROSES 

2-year plants, 60c each; $5.00 for 10. 
CUMBING AMEBICAN BEAUTY — Rich rosy crim- 
son, sweet-scented flowers on a strong-growing 
climbing vine. Blooms profusely. 

DOBOTHY PEBXnrS — Beautiful shell-pink flowers 
with a fine fragrance. Borne in magnificent clusters. 
DB. W. VAN FI.EET — Probably the best climbing 
Rose, with attractive flesh-pink flowers. Very showy. 
EXCEI.SA — A red Dorothy Perkins with fine large. 

double flowers. 
GABDEMTA — Of exceedingly vigorous growth, with 
small yellow buds opening to creamy white. 
MABY WAI.I>AC;e — Of rampant growth, with long 
pink buds. Blooms freely on long stems. 
PAUIi'S SCABItET — The most intense red Rose that 
grows. By far the finest climbing Rose in existence. 
Never fades out in the hottest sun. retaining its 
-vivid brilliant red color at all times. 
SILVEB MOON — Large, semi-double flowers, prim- 
rose in the bud, changing to white with rosy anthers 
in the center. 




Sonvenier De Claudius Pernet. 



iG 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



Vines and Hedge Plants 




Boston Ivy. 



VINES 

BOSTON IVY (AmpelopBis VeitclU) — The well known 
and much used vine for i.ovorinK walls, brick work 
and where a climbing plant is used, foliage dark 
green, turning to scarlet in the fall of the year. 
2 years, 50c each. 

CIiEIkCATIS PANICTJLATA (Japanese Clematis) — 

Flowers while, slui-shaped. produced during the 
summer and fall upon long shoots. In addition to 
its profusion of fragrant Howers the foliage is hand- 
some. Strong' plants, 40c each. 

CI.X:MATIS JACEffiLAKm (Iiarge Floweringr 

Clematis) — Large aiul intinse violet-purple: free ami 
abundant bloomer. Strong' plants, 60c each. 

IiONICESA (Honeysuckle) — Their twining qualities 
aif all Hint can be desired, but the delightful fra- 
giance of their Howers makes their strongest bid for 
favor. The Honeysuckle perfume is remembered and 
loved throughout the world. 2 year, 35c each. 

VAR. HAJiXiEANA — Color, an intermingling of white 
and .\illii\\: e.xiremely fragrant and most satisfac- 
tory. This variety is inost often found growing on 
porch trellises or used as a covering for unsightly 
fences. 2 year, 35c each. 

CHINESi: "WISTERIA — A very strong grower: it 
climbs high and twines tightly, nowers sky blue in 



Strong: plants. 



drooping clusters in early spring. 
50c each. 

DUTCHIdlAIT'S PIPE (Aristolochia Sipho) — Brown- 
ish, pipe-shaped flowers. Highly useful for its largi- 
leaves which make a perfect screen for porches. A 
native climber of quick growth. Strong plants, 
75c each. 

HEDGING 

CAX.IFOBKIA PRIVET— This beautiful hedge plant 
has a larger leaf than Amur Privet, and is very 
btautiful in summer and fall, lending itself admir- 
ably to shearing. However, we do not consider it 
as useful for planting in the South as Amur River 
because it loses some of its foliage in the winter, 
whereas, Amur River Privet will look pretty the 
Year round. 12 to 18 inch, 60c for 12; $1.00 for 25; 
$1.75 for 50. 

AMUR RIVER PRIVET (I.. Amurensis) — Most 
popular and best hedge for the North.' Very beau- 
tiful evergreen, dense in growth, dark green, very 
compact, and establishes a very good hedge in one 
year. Very hardy and well adapted to general plant- 
ing. Exceedingly lieautiful and permits shearing to 
anv height or shape. 12 to 18 inch, $1.20 for 12; 
$2.25 for 25; $4.00 for SO. 




RES BARBERRY — .V tine, low-growing highly- 
colored shrub for planting around the house, as a 
hedge, or as specimen. Leaves small, bright green, 
changing in fall to scarlet; berries red and will 
remain on well into the winter. 1 year plants, 
55c each. 

BARBERRY THUITBERai (Japan Barberry) — For 

hedges or group planting, this plant is very largely 
used. Will stand any amount of clipping and will 
thrive in shady places. Perfectly hard.v everywhere. 
In the autumn turns to a brilliant crimson and the 
abundant bright scarlet berries add color all winter. 
12 to 18 inch size, 15c each; 40c for 3. 




California Privet. 



Vines and Hedges wanted hy Parcel Post, see page 28 for Postal Rates. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



27 



Hardy Perennial Plants 

Many gardeners prefer to start with perennial plants instead of sowing seed, as in that way a showy, 
colorful "display may be had more quicklv. All plants supplied by us have been grown carefully and are 
sure to give entire satisfaction. They will be shippped directly from the Nursery at the proper time 
for planting. If Perennial Plants are wanted by mail, see paffe 28 for Parcel Post rates. 

Perennial Prices : 25c each; 3 for 65c. 




Hardy Carnation. 



ACHILLEA : Milfoil 

PTABMICA (The Pearl) — Pure 

white, double flowers produced on 
sturdy plants all during the sum- 
mer. Grows 2 feet tall. 

ANCHUSA : Bugloss 

DSOPUOSE — A tall growing 
stately perennial with large, bril- 
liant "blue flowers during June. 
Grows 6 to 8 feet tall. 

AQUILEGIA : Columbine 

HYBBIDS — A foremost strain 
with beautiful large flowers in 
many exquisite colors and color 
combinations. Blooms during May 
and June. 

HARDY ASTERS 

ANITA BAIjIiABD — A double- 
flowered variety with clear 
Petunia-violet blooms. Very 
showy and strong growing. 
BIiUZ: GEM — The flowers of this 
variety are quite large and double. 
They are a blue shade of great 
richness. 

CIiUKLAX — Majestic spikes crown- 
ed by light lavender-blue flowers. 
•5 feet. 

BCBS. BAYNOB — The deepest red 
of all perennial Hardy Asters. 
MIXEI) — A complete mixture of 
all colors. Showy and free bloom- 
ing. 

CAMPANULA 

SINGIiB miXBD — Mostly grown 
as biennials with large, bell- 
shaped blooms during July. 
Height. 2 to 3 feet. 
CAItTCAITTHBIIXA IHIXBD — The 
beautiful Cup-and-Saucer Canter- 
bury Bells in rose, pink, and blue. 
Blooms during July. 

COREOPSIS 

IiAKCBOIiATA — One of the show- 
iest of all perennials, with large, 
golden yellow blooms all during 
the summer. Grows 2 feet tall 
and provides a wonderful bit of 
yellow color to combine with blue 
Delphiniums and others. 



CARNATION 
Hardy Grenadin 

These excellent hardy Carna- 
tions bloom very profusely during 
summer a nd fal l. 

G-IANT ■WHITE — Fine large dou- 
ble white flowers borne very free- 
Iv on fine strong stems. 
GIANT PINK — This is a par- 
ticularly popular color. Blooms 
verv profusely. 

GIANT BED — Adds a good shade 
of color to the perennial bed or 
rock garden. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM 

VICTOBIfl. — Large white double 
flowers in great profusion. 
GOIiDEN QUEEN — Beautiful 
golden yellow flowers. Always 
double. 

AUTtTMN GIiOW — Bronzy red. 
OLD HOMESTEAD — The flowers 
are a bright clear pink. Blooms 
freely. 




Clxrysanthemvuu. 



DELPHINIUM 

ENGLISH HVBBIDS — AH those 
who have seen this strain are 
unanimous in proclaiming it un- 
usually fine. It includes a wide 
range of colors. The flowers come 
double, semi-double, and single. 
Very showy. 

BEIiIiADONNA — Fine showy 
plants, producing an abundance of 
sturdy, long flower-spikes closely 
set with large, single, sky-blue 
blooms. The plants grow 4 feet 
tall. 

BEIiXiAMOSTTM — An excellent 
strong-growing, free-blooming va- 
riety. Grows 4 feet tall and has 
large, single, dark blue flowers. 

FOXGLOVE : Digitalis 

GIiOXINIA-PLOWEBED — One of 

our most showy biennials, with 
large bell-shaped blooms on tall 
spikes. Includes many colors. 

FUNKIA : Plantain Lily 

UNDXTLATA VABIEGATA — 

Creamy white foliage marked with 
bright green. Light blue flowers. 
SUBCOBDATA — Magnificent for 
shaded or semi-shaded locations. 



bearing large white flowers dur- 
ing the summer; 2 feet tall. 
Showy leaves. 

GYPSOPHILA 
Baby's Breath 

PANICULATA — Dainty small 
white blooms during August and 
September on plants 2 feet tall. 
Excellent for cutting. 

HOLLYHOCKS 

DOTJBIiE MIXED — A marvelous 
strain of Hollyhock with fully 
double flowers placed closely to- 
gether on stems 6 to 8 feet tall. 

LUPINUS 

American gardeners never have 
come to realize as yet the value 
of Lupines in the perennial gar- 
den. The plants thrive in a rich 
sandy soil and make a wonderful 
showing, particularly if planted in 
masses. Blooms from June until 
August, growing 2 to 4 feet tall. 
BZiTTE WHITE BOSE 

PYRETHRUM 
Persian Daisy 

SINGLE MIXED — Lovely large 
Daisy-like blooms in white, pink, 
rose, and crimson, borne during 
the spring and fall. 2 to 3 feet 
tall. 

STOKESIA 

CYANEA, BLUE — Blue Corn- 
flower-like blooms during July 
and August. Grows 2 feet tall. 

TRITOMA : Red Hot Poker 

FFITZEBI — The blooms are 
crowded into a solid spike of a 
bright orange-red color. Blooms 
during the summer; 2 to 3 feet 

tall. 

VERONICA 

LONGIPOLIA SUBSESSILIS — 

Blue flowers from July to Septem- 
ber. Very handsome; 2 feet tall. 

VIOLA 
Tufted Pansies and Violets 

JEBSEY GEM — Rich violet 

blooms borne very profusely. 
PBINCE OP "WALES — A large 

Violet with deep purple blooms. 




Shasta Daisy. 



28 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



HARDY FLOWERING SHRUBS 

ALL FIELD GROWN PLANTS THAT WILL PLEASE YOU 




Snowball Hydrangea. 



Butterfly Bush. 



Altbea. 



Beutzla. 



AXiTHBA, or BOSE OP SHABON — Familiar shrubs, 
deserving- more popularity than they receive. Their 
abundance of bloom comes at a comparatively 
flowerless time, from July to September. There is a 
vvMde diversity of color in the flowers of different 
varieties, though all of the plants are of the same 
upright character. 35c each. 

BTTDDIiBZA (Butterfly Bush) — A very strong 
grower; free flowering, with large graceful panicles 
of purple flowers: blooming the entire summer. We 
recommend this shrub most highly. 35c each. 

AIiMOlTD, FIiOWXBUTG — A dwarf growing, early 
blooming shrub. Flowers resemble small roses, 
borne all along the stems in great profusion in the 
early spring. AVe can furnish pink or white, specify 
color desired when ordering. 50c each. 
DEXTTZIA (Pride of Rochester) — Popular because of 
its blossoms, which are large, double white, tinted 
rose on under side. Shrub large, blooms early. Very 
desirable. 35c each. 

POBSYTHIA, or GOI.DEN BBI.Z. — The earliest 
blooming of all .shrub.';. Plants a mass of golden 
fringe-shaped bloom.s bifore the leaves appear. 
35c each. 

TIiOWUBXNG QtrrNCTE (Cydonla Japonica) — One of 

tlie most popular shrubs. The variety we offer has 
bright red flowers which appear very early in the 
spring before the leaves force, literally covering the 
plant. Blossoms hold on for a long time. 50c each. 

MOCK OBAITGZ: (Philadelphus) — An old favorite 
with gnandmother. A vigorous growing shrub at- 
t.aining a height of S feet. Used extensively as 
hedge or specimen plant. Literally covers itself in 
spring with white blossoms. 40c each. 



HYDBANGBA PAITICVI^ATA G-BAimiPI.OBA (Pee 

Q-ee Hydrangea) — The exceedingly well known va- 
riety. Its large conical heads of white flowers be- 
come pink and red with age. Should have plenty of 
water during flowering season and cut back severely 
every year in order to produce large flowers. 
50c each. 

HYDBANGBA ABBOBBSCBNS GBA1TDIFI.OB& 

(Snowhall Hydrangea) — Its large clusters of pure 
white flowers, average 4 and 5 inches in diameter, 
appear from the middle of May to September. This 
sort docs well in partial shade. 50c each. 

COBAX. BBBBT, or IJSTDIAN CUBB&NT — A small 
shrub attaining a height of 4 feet; graceful arching 
habit of growth. Produces red berries in profusion 
in early autumn which hang on until spring. 
40c each. 

SNOWBEBBY — .\n upright low-growing shrub with 
pink flowers in .July, which is valued for its waxy, 
showy while berries in fall. Very effective in mass 
in the shrubbery border. 40c each. 

SPIBEA VAN HOITTTE — The most popular variety 
of Spirea. Forms a graceful pendulous bush, sur- 
passes all other varieties, with its superb beauty and 
gracefulness. Pure white flowers, fine for hedges or 
for specimen planting. 35c each, 

SPIBEA ANTHOirr WATEBEB — The well known 
variety, used a great deal for edging and massing, 
in constant bloom from early summer until late fall. 
Beautiful heads of red flowers. 50c each. 

WEI(3iEIiA BOSEA — The prettiest of the Weigelas 
In our section. Literally covered with trumpet- 
shaped blossoms, pink color; branches drooping. 
40c each. 



Parcel Post Rates on Strawberry Plants 







Zones 


Zone 


Zone 


Zone 


Zone 


Zone 


Zone 






1-2. 


3. 


4. 


5. 


6. 


7. 


8. 


100 


Plants. 


$ .10 


$.14 


$.21 


$.28 


$ .35 


.? .43 


$ .50 


200 


Plants. 


.13 


.20 


.33 


.46 


.59 


.73 


.86 


300 


Plants. 


.16 


.26 


.45 


.64 


.83 


1.03 


1.22 


400 


Plants. 


.21 


.36 


.65 


.94 


1.23 


1.53 


1.82 


500 


Plants. 


.26 


.46 


.85 


1.24 


1.63 


2.03 


2.42 


600 


Plants . 


.20 


.52 


.97 


1.42 


1.88 


2.33 


2.78 


700 


Plants. 


.31 


.56 


1.05 


1.54 


2.03 


2.53 


3.02 


800 


Plants. 


.36 


.66 


1.25 


1.84 


2.44 


3.03 


3.62 


900 


Plants. 


.38 


.70 


1.33 


1.96 


2.59 


3.23 


3.86 


1000 


Plants. 


.41 


.76 


1.45 


2.14 


2.84 


3.53 


4.22 


2000 


Plants. 


..56 


1.06 













On all orders of 500 plants or more, the rate is 
cheaper by Express after the Third Zone. 
Tbe ahove postage rates insure all mall shipments. 



Parcel Post Rates on Grape Vines, Rasp- 
berries, Blackberries, Rose Bushes 
and Ornamental Vines 

Zones Zone Zone Zone Zone Zone Zone 
1-2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 

1 to 2 $.07 $.08 $.09 $.10 $.11 $.13 $.14 

3 to 6 09 .12 .17 .22 .27 .33 .38 

6 to 12 11 .16 .25 .34 .43 .53 .62 

12 to 20 16 .26 .45 .64 .83 1.03 1.22 

20 to 25 21 .36 .65 .94 1.23 1.53 1.82 

25 to 35 26 .46 .85 1.24 1.63 2.03 2.42 

35 to 50 36 .66 1.25 1.84 2.43 3.03 3.62 

50 to 75 46 .86 1.65 2.44 3.23 4.03 4.82 

75 to 100 56 1.06 2.05 3.04 4.03 5.03 6.02 

Ornamental Hedges, Shrubs and Perennials wanted 
by Parcel Post add 3c a plant extra over the above 
postage rates. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



29 



Townsend^s 1931 Price List 



IMPOBTAKT NOTE: Parcel Post Orders must con- 
tain additional remittance for postage as shown on 
table at bottom of page 28. If not included we will 
ship by express. 



P&XCES NOT PKEFAID— AU F. O. B. Salisbury, Md. 
500 or more of a variety at 1,000 rates; less quanti- 
ties of each variety at prices listed below. 



FOR STRAWBERRY PLANT PRICES SEE NEXT PAGE 





12 
Plants 


25 
Plants 


50 

Plants 


100 

Plants 


250 

Plants 


1000 

Plants 


BLACK RASPBERRIES 

Black Diamond Xo 1 Tips 1-\t 


$0.75 
.75 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
.75 
1.50 

1.00 
1.60 
1.00 
1.60 

1.75 
1.00 
1.60 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.60 
1.00 
1.00 
1.60 
.85 
1.50 
1.75 

1.50 
1.00 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
.75 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 

2.00 
.75 
.75 

4.50 

2.50 
2.50 
1.50 
1 50 


$1.25 
1.25 
2.40 
2.00 
2.00 
1.25 
2.40 

2.00 
2.65 
2.00 
2.65 

3.00 
2.00 
2.65 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.65 
2.00 
2.00 
2.65 
1.60 
2.40 
3.00 

3,00 

1.75 
3,00 
1,75 
1,75 
3,00 
1,25 
1,75 
1.75 
3,00 

4,00 
1.00 
1.00 
8.00 

4 00 
4,00 
2,00 
2 00 


$2,25 
2.25 
4,25 
3,50 
3.50 
2.25 
4,25 

3.50 

4.75 
3,50 
4.75 

See page 

3,50 

4.75 

3,50 

3.50 

3,50 

4,75 

3,50 

3.50 

4,75 

3,00 

4,25 
See Page 

5,00 
3,00 
5,00 
3,00 
3,00 
5,00 
2,25 
3.00 
3,00 
5,00 

7,50 

1.50 

1.50 

15.00 


S4.00 
4.00 
7,60 
6,00 
6,00 
4,00 
7,60 

6,00 
8.60 
6.00 
8.60 

14 for de 

6.00 

8.60 

6.00 

6.00 

6.00 

8.60 

6.00 

6.00 

8,60 

5,00 

7 60 
19 forde 

9,00 
5,00 
9,00 
5,00 
5,00 
9,00 
4,00 
5,00 
5,00 
9,00 

10,00 

2,50 

2,50 
25,00 


$8,00 
8,00 

ii'oo 

12,00 
8,00 

12.00 

"n.bb" 

scription 
12.00 

n'.ob" 

12.00 
12.00 

'i2'66" 

12,00 
12,00 
10.50 

scription 

20,00 
11.50 

'ii!s6" 

11,50 
20,00 
8,00 
11,50 
11,50 
20,00 

20,00 
4,00 
4 00 


$25 00 


Cumberland Xo. 1 Tips, 1-yr. 


25 00 


Cumberland Transplants, 2->t 

Honey Sweet No. 1 Tips, 1->t 


46!66 


Plum Farmer No. 1 Tips, l-^T 

Plum Farmer Transplants, 2-yr 

PURPLE RASPBERRIES 

Cardinal No. 1 Tips, 1-yr 

Cardinal Transplants, 2-yr 

Columbian No. 1 Tips, 1->T 

Columbian Transplants, 2->t 

RED RASPBERRIES 

Chief 

Cuthbert No. 1, 1-jt 


25.00 
40,00 

"46!66' 
46.66' 


Herbert No. 1, 1-yr 

King Red No. 1, 1-yr 

Latham No. 1, l-yr 


40.00 
40,00 
40.00 


Rathman (New) No. 1, 1-yr 

Katherine Everbearing, 1-yr 

Katherine Transplants, 2-yT 


40.00 

'46! 66' 

32 50 


St. Regis Transplants, 2-yr 

V'iking 

BLACKBERRIES (From Root Cuttings) 

.Arlfred No. 1, R. C 

Blnwer No. 1, R. C 

Cr>-8tal V\-hite No. 1, R. C 

Early Harvest No. 1, R. C 

Eldorado No. 1, R. C 

Macatawa No. 1, R. C 

McDonald No. 1 , R. C 

Mesereau No. 1, R. C 

Russell's, or Best-of-All (New Rust- Resistant) No. 1. R. C 

DEWBERRIES (Selected Strong Rooted Tips) 

Aus Lu (New) , 1-yr 

Austin, 1-yr 


of V'iking 

60.00 
40.00 

"46!66' 

40,00 
60,00 
25,00 
40,00 
40.00 

60,00 
15 00 


Lucreatia, 1->T 


15 00 


Youngberrj- (New), 1->t. (6 Plants, $2.50) 




TRANSPLANTED BLACKBERRIES and DEWBERRIES 

Alfred, B. B 

Early Harvest, B. B 

Austin, D. B 

Lucreatia. D. B 





GRAPE VINES 

TWO-TEAB SIZE TWO-YEAB SIZE 

Top and Boot Pruned, Beady to Set 
Ag-awam, Red Delaware, Red aioore's Early, Black 
Catawba, Red Niagara, A\'hite Worden, Black 

1 Vine $.35 25 Vines $ 5.00 

3 Vines 90 50 Vines 10.00 

6 Vines 1.55 100 Vines 18.00 

12 Vines 3.00 1000 Vines 150.00 

For Three-Tear Vines Double These Prices 



The FOUR NEW Grapes With 
Outstanding Quality 

TWO-YEAB SIZE TWO-YEAE SIZE 

For descriptions, see page 

Caco. New Red $ .60 each 

Portland. New "White 75 each 

Predonia. New Early Black 75 each 

Ontario. New White 75 each 

Sheridan. New Black 75 each 

(Customers wanting 3-year size, add 50c to above 
prices on each vine) 



CONCORD, The Standard Black Grape 



l=Year 


2=Year 






l=Year 


2=Year 


1 Vine. . . $ .20 


$ .25 


50 


Vines . 


. 3.50 


4.00 


6 Vines. . .70 


.80 


100 


Vines . 


. 6.00 


7,50 


12 Vines. . .95 


1.20 


500 


Vines . 


. 20.00 


25.00 


25 Vines. . 2.00 


2.25 


1000 


Vines . 


. 40.00 


55.00 



FRESH DUG STOCK 

We furnish only fresh stock dug direct 
from the fields in which your order is 
filled; being superior in quality to cold 
storage stock, having been dug in fall 
and stored over winter. 

Shipments by Mail 
Customers wishing any plants on this 
page; sent Parcel Post; Postage rates 
can be found on page 28, 



3° 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS' STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



SPRING, 1931 CTDAWDrppirC FALL, 1931 
Townsend's Special Wholesale Prices Direct to Growers! 

More Than a Quarter Century Direct Selling 
One Price to All - - A Square Deal to Everyone 

Extra Early 

Per Per Per Per Per Per Per 

12 25 50 100 250 500 1000 

4 JUPITER (p) $2.50 $4.00 $G.00 $10.00 $25.00 $50.00 $100.00 

5 BLAKEMORE (p) 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.50 5.50 10.00 

2 FRUITLAND (p) 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.50 5.00 10.00 

6 Heflin Early (p) 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.50 5.50 10.00 

6 PREMIER (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

6 ST. LOUIS (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.50 8.00 

6 SUCCESS (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.50 8.00 

G TOWNSENDS MISSIONARY (p) 40 .60 1.00 1.90 3.00 5.00 

Medium Early 

1 HOWARD'S SUPREME (I) 2.50 4.00 6.00 10.00 25.00 50.00 100.00 

3 ABERDEEN (p) 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.50 5.50 10.00 

COOPER (p) 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.50 5.50 10.00 

6 DUNLAP (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

G Dr. Burrill (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

6 KLONDYKE (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

Medium Late 

7 AROMA (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

7 BIG JOE (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

7 BTRGESS (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

7 GIBSON (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

7 SAMPLE (I) GO .80 1.30 2.35 4.50 8.00 

Late to Very Late 

9 TOWNSEND BIG LATE (I) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.50 S.OO 

!) BOOSTER (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.50 8.00 

10 CHESAPEAKE (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

9 FORD (p) 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.50 5.50 10.00 

9 GANDY (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

9 LUPTON late (p) 60 .80 1.30 2.35 4.00 7.00 

9 MASCOT (p) 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.50 5.50 10.00 

4 "MAYQUEEN" (I) 2.00 3.00 4.00 7.00 10.00 20.00 

8 "TOWNKING" (p) 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.50 5.50 10.00 

9 WM. BELT (p) 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.50 5.50 10.00 

9 WORLD'S WONDER (p) 2.00 3.00 4.00 7.00 10.00 20.00 

Surplus Plants .40 .70 1.00 1.75 3.00 5.00 

Everbearing 

11 "LUCKY=STRIKE" (p) 2.00 3.00 5.00 12.00 18.00 30.00 

11 MASTODON (p) 1.50 2.50 3.00 6.00 9.50 18.00 

11 Progressive (p) 1.50 2.50 3.00 G.OO 9.50 18.00 

CASH DISCOUNTS 

All orders for $25.00 or more received in January, cash with order, 10% discount. 

All orders for $25.00 or more received in February, cash with order. 5% discount. 
Orders booked when one-fourth of amount is sent with order but no Discount. 

WE DO NOT MAKE SHIPMENTS C. O. D. unless one-fourth the amount accompanies the order. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT 

'-Every Order Received Amounting to $100 or More Will Receive Free: 
50 HOWARP SUPREME and 50 JUPITER, value $12.00. 

WARNING — Place orders early. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SONS, SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



31 



Pedigree of Howard Supreme As Furnished by the Originator 



BREEDING OF HOWARD'S SUPREME 

Cresent (P) 





NTo. 103 (P)* 


Marshall (S) 


] 
No. 14 (P) 




Howard 


Xo. 17 (34%C: 




Supreme (P) 


Cresent (P) 




Cresent (P) 




No. 1 


Haverland (Pt 








Sharpless (S) 
















Clyde (S) 


Belmont (S)* 


Cresent (P) 






- 




Cyclone (S) 








Cumberland Triumph (P> 






Green Prolific (P) 








v 




*S Staminate 




Lucinda ( S ) 


P Pistillate 







HOWARD SUPREME carries 60% of crescent blood, which dominated all markets from 1875 to 
1890, giving better seedlings to the world than any other variety ever originated. 

History and Breeding of Howard's Supreme Strawberry 

The No. 1 was produced by crossiriK still another 
one of the Howard seedlings, the No. 14, with pollen 
from the Clyde. 

The Clyde was a seedling of the Cyclone which in 
turn was a seedling of the Crescent. 

The No. 14 was a seedling of the Haverland cross- 
ed by the Belmont. 

The No. 14 was a berry that possessed many very 
desirable qualities, such as strong healthy foliage, 
fine quality berries of good size and color and withal 
productiveness. 

The Haverland was a seedling of the Crescent. 

The various seedling strawberries mentioned in 
the breeding of Howard Supreme should have been 
introduced, for they were berries that were well 
above the average of strawberry introductions, but 
the originators were looking for the Ideal Berry — 
a berry perfect in every sense of the word, some- 
thing far ahead of any in cultivation! 

The originators are proud of the fact that Howard 
Supreme carries blood of so many of the leading 
strawberries of America and Europe; that the pedi- 
gree of its ancestral breeding dates back to the first 
great American strawberry, the Hovey, in 1834, and 
to the British Queen in 1840! And also the fact that 
Crescent blood has entered so largely into the breed- 
ing of this seedling, for no less than four times was 
the famous Crescent used as a mother plant to help 
produce the royal lineage that has been brought 
down to date and united in the Howard Supreme. 



This new pistillate seedling was originated in 1909, 
at Belchertown. Massachusetts, by Everett C. How- 
ard, Junior member of the firm of A. B. Howard & 
Son, Horticulturists, in their experimental and trial 
grounds. 

The Senior member, the late Arthur B. Howard, 
originated the Howard No. 17 versus The Premier 
in 1904. and many other fruits and flowers, during 
nearly a life time spent in plant breeding and im- 
provement. 

Howard Supreme was produced in their green- 
house, using Howard's No. 103 as the mother plant, 
in 1907. 

Pollen was applied by a camel's hair brush from 

the now famous Howard's No. 17 to make the cross. 

'The following spring the seeds were sown in their 

greenhouse and the new seedlings fruited for the 

first time in their trial beds in 1909. 

This new variety was the most striking and dis- 
tinct of any of the lot of 1000 seedlings fruiting at 
the time from 10 various crosses. 

The mother plant. No. 103, was a seedling of the 
Orescent crossed by the Marshall. 

In many ways the No. 103 was a wonder, espe- 
'■ially in productiveness, size, quality, color, and 
firmness. 

In fact it was too productive, and after a number 
of years trial it failed to hold its seedling vigor, and 
thu's it failed to carry out its immense loads of 
fruit. 

This seedling was never named or introduced. 
However the originators saw great possibilities in 
the variety for breeding purposes and as such it was 
largely used by them. 

The Howard 17 was also a seedling of the Crescent 
crossed by another one of the Howard seedlings, the 
No. 1. 

The Howard No. 1 was a berry of many desirable 
qualities, especially strong healthy foliage, beautiful 
in appearance and extra fine quality of berry. 



Thus the Howard Supreme carries 60 per cent of 
Crescent blood. 

"The Crescent has been grown more than any 
other variety except the "U^ilson. Between 1875 and 
1890 it dominated all markets." 

"It is a very prepotent variety, a larger number of 
valuable varieties are descendants of the Cresent 
than any other sort." 

(Signed) EVERETT C. HOWARD. 



me WILLIAM flTRD PRESS. INC. 

HORTICULTURAL PRINTERS. 

RICHMOND. VA. 




.«i^iis«>k "^ nH^^t^ 



A Field of Howard's Supreme Strawberry Plants 

These plants will be used to fill your orders this season. 



What Some of the Leading Horticulturists Think of it. 



FBOF. WM. P. BBOOKS, Of the Massachusetts 
Station, TOTites: 
I have g-iowii Howard's Supreme for 10 or 12 
years, and regard it as a very valuable sort. I 
regard it as being- superior to Premier in shape, 
color, and quality. 

PROr. STANLEY JOHNSOIT, Michigan State 
Collegre, writes: 

We have grown Howard's Supreme and found it 
to be very productive, a good plant maker. Fair 
in Quality and attractive. On the whole it is a 
promising variety. 

PSOF. O. C. BOBESTS, Amherst, Mass., writes: 

For the past three years we have grown How- 
ard's Supreme, with forty different varieties — 
each year the Howard's Supreme has exceeded 
the yield of Howard 17 (Premier) by more than 
15 per cent. It is among the best in plant mak- 
ing. Berries large and firm, with a rich color. 
"Without question it excels any variety we have 
under observation. 



PBOr. GEO. I.. SLATE, Geneva Station, N. Y., 
writes: 

We have grown Howard's Supreme since 1920, 
and during that period it has been among the 
best varieties. Plants vigorous and productive; 
resistant to leaf spot, and more resistant to 
drought than the average variety. Fruit very at- 
tractive, juicy, firm, pleasantly sprightly. Good 
to very good in quality. Well worthy of a trial. 
.\nd I am glad to know that it is to be introduced. 

PBOr. J. GOTJBI.EY, 'Wooster Station, Ohio, 
writes : 
We have been growing Howard's Supreme for a 
good many years. Have always been well pleased 
with it. Better than Howard 17. being strong, 
vigorous grower. Berries large, firm, deep red in 
color through and through. An excellent canning 
variety. Also good for market as well as home 
use. Glad to know it is to be introduced. Too 
good to remain in trial grounds so long. 

FBOF. GEO. M. DABBCW, Sept. of Ag'ricnlture, 
'Washing'ton, D. C, writes: 

Howard's Supreme particularly good with us. 



I urge every one of our customers to try a few of these plants along with 
Jupiter, this season. I have great faith in them. — E. W. T., Pres.